valour


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to valour: Valour or Valor

discretion is the better part of valor

Caution is more important than bravery. The expression emphasizes the importance of being cautious and reserving acts of bravery for when they are actually needed. I know you want to try that risky skateboard jump, but remember that discretion is the better part of valor.
See also: better, discretion, of, part

Discretion is the better part of valor.

Prov. It is good to be brave, but it is also good to be careful.; If you are careful, you will not get into situations that require you to be brave. Son: Can I go hang gliding with my friends? Father: No. Son: But they'll say I'm chicken if I don't go! Father: Discretion is the better part of valor, and I'd rather have them call you chicken than risk your life.
See also: better, discretion, of, part

discretion is the better part of valor

It is better to be prudent than merely courageous, as in I'm signing up for the easy course first; discretion is the better part of valor. This proverb, a synonym of look before you leap, was first recorded in 1477. Charles Churchill put it in poetic form: "Even in a hero's heart, Discretion is the better part" ( The Ghost, 1762). Shakespeare also used a form of it: "The better part of valor is discretion" ( 1 Henry IV, 5:4).
See also: better, discretion, of, part

discretion is the better part of valour

it's better to avoid a dangerous situation than to confront it. proverb

diˌscretion is the ˌbetter part of ˈvalour

(British English) (American English diˌscretion is the ˌbetter part of ˈvalor) (saying) you should avoid danger and not take unnecessary risksThis comes from Shakespeare’s play Henry IV.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Duke of Devonshire, the Queen's representative at Ascot, then wrote to Rush, and the result was a meeting with Wilkie, and the birth of Value for Valour.
Based at RAF Honiton, she attended Royal Ascot last month and took advantage of the Value for Valour offer.
The Cross of Valour is the nearest civilian equivalent of the military's Victoria Cross.
If that is accepted, then all police officers, firemen, and soldiers who lose their lives in the performance of their duty deserve to be considered for the Cross of Valour.
An examination of some of the actions for which individuals did or did not receive the Cross of Valour confirms why it should not be awarded posthumously to Garrett.
One of the first men to be awarded a posthumous Cross of Valour was Royal Canadian Navy sailor Vaino Partanen.
Often even those who knowingly risk their lives for others have not received the Cross of Valour. In 1996 Hazel White was staying with a friend who feared her estranged husband who frequently had assaulted her.
In 1975 Australia created a system that is almost identical to Canada's with a Cross of Valour, Star of Courage, and Medal of Bravery.
Canadian valour awards will have little meaning as they will become popularity contests with each police, fire, and military organization championing its nominee.
It is right to want to honour Constable Garrett for his devotion to duty and his bravery, but this should not involve awarding him a posthumous Cross of Valour.