utter

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Related to utterer: ureter

not utter a word

To be completely silent; to remain discreet (about something); to not tell anyone (about something). All the while our father was shouting at us, my sister and I didn't utter a word. Tom, don't you dare utter a word about this! I would die of embarrassment if anyone were to find out.
See also: not, utter, word

not open one's mouth

 and not utter a word
Fig. not to say anything at all; not to tell something (to anyone). Don't worry, I'll keep your secret. I won't even open my mouth. Have no fear. I won't utter a word.
See also: mouth, not, open

not open one's mouth

Also, shut one's mouth; not say or utter a word . Be silent, repress one's feelings or opinions, keep a secret. For example, Don't worry, I'm not going to open my mouth on this issue, or She promised not to say a word about it to anyone. Also see hold one's tongue; keep one's mouth shut.
See also: mouth, not, open

utter a word

See also: utter, word
References in periodicals archive ?
(112.) See Conant, Elucidation and Nonsense, supra note 108, at 196 ("[T]he aim for the Tractarian elucidation is to reveal (through the employment of mere nonsense) that what appears to be substantial nonsense is mere nonsense."); see also Cheung, supra note 13, at 200 (concluding that, according to Diamond and Conant, "the Tractatus is not trying to help anyone see any unsayable insights," but that "the aim of the Tractatus is merely to liberate nonsense utterers from nonsense, and that this is to be achieved by the non-frame sentences serving as elucidations").
This would be the case if the sequence of words rendered above by 'yet neither the utterer nor the hearer approaches through words the [relation] of attainment [between words and their objects]' (praptim tu ...
(OEuvres 922) The overload of consonants produces guttural sounds that remain caught in the throat of their utterer. Thus, they are closer to constituting a private utterance that is incommunicable and untranslatable; but unlike the magical syllables that are untranslatable because they do not need to be translated-- insofar as their meaning lies in their performance and in the reader's ability to pronounce them--these so-called words are untranslatable because they resist all forms of readability and vocalization.
The difference between lying and telling the truth to a police officer in a traffic stop is more than external consequences; it also lies in the orientation of the utterer to those consequences, the other participant, and what respect they command in knowing one's inner intentions.
will, in this context, render the utterer susceptible to one sort
Accordingly, the forger was put to Death; the utterer of a bad note was put to Death; the unlawful opener of a letter was put to Death; the purloiner of forty shillings and sixpence was put to Death; ...
And reveals nothing so much as the utterer's utter ignorance.
Grice, "Utterer's Meaning and Intentions," Philosophical Review 78 (1969), pp.
Just as the meaning of an individual sentence may not be in accord with an utterer's particular intention, so too some elements of a narrative may work against rather than with its larger purposeful design.
In Agamben's view, the performative function characterizing Paul's words of faith draws attention not to language's ability to establish a relation of truth with the world, but rather to the form of the utterance itself that, as such, mutually binds the utterer and the listener.
Accordingly, the beginning and end can be seen as spatial or temporal (or spatio-temporal) categories, and the rhetorical exchange in these oppositions provides a tool with which to create descriptions of reality according to the preferences of the utterer (e.g.
In this sense, the Korean utterer of the word "IMF" already begins with some credibility, because using the acronym strengthens the notion of the in-group allegiance against the unknown and dangerous out-group, the IMF.
And it is precisely in the public space of communication, circumscribed by total censorship, that the question of the utterer's subjectivity comes to the forefront.
For him, the word in any dialogue was not exclusively that of the utterer; the listener and prior users of the word all have claims to the word as well.