urge (one) to (do something)

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urge (one) to (do something)

To prompt, compel, encourage, or plead with one to take some action. I was hesitant at first, but my wife urged me to testify. I urged her to write these stories down, as I was sure they'd make a great book.
See also: urge
References in classic literature ?
But he did not force them upon our notice, nor urge us to read them, and I think this was very well.
'Today, as we celebrate the Eid-el-Kabir, I urge us to allow the teachings of Prophet Muhammad to reflect in our daily relationships with our fellow men.
Where we do part company, and where I do mind, is that it is plainly hypocritical for America to urge us to sacrifice control when they would not dream of ever doing the same."
Just when we thought that some strange force will urge us to succeed, if only for a moment to avoid the cruel reality of daily politics, we bit our tongue again.
Carney (right) is 50-1 with Ladbrokes to ban tea bags at the Bank and 1-3 to urge us to hang used ones out to dry.
Two decades of failed mitigation, of failure of both carbon taxes and cap-and-trade, the arguments of those who would urge us to at least examine other mitigation paths, plus the well-understood examples of the failure of economic instruments that dominated fisheries and forestry management in Canada, should have us looking at alternative paths.
Are these the same people who urge us to show restraint?
I think my mother and my mother-in-law, however, would urge us to commission a second article from the parents' point of view.
But, many of our constituents urge us to bring more information into the statements themselves, such as off-balance-sheet financing.
Taken together, then, today's lessons both urge us to engagement with the powers of this world and assure us that not "anything ...
Dieticians urge us to include more omega-3, a polyunsaturated fat, in our diets.
Through all of this a sinister, disembodied voice continues to urge us to "press the red button" - and bet.
The natural world is a "bearer of divine grace," and the bishops urge us to become "co-creators," to join in repairing creation, seriously damaged by our "ecological sins".
More than few people stopped to urge us to press on because we were filling an important role.
The impending "black cloud" of rising interest rates and inflationary pressures combined with the technological revolution that has boosted price/earnings ratios to historically high level lacking algebraic and mathematical explanations, urge us to take a realistic perspective regarding the future.