urge (one) to (do something)

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urge (one) to (do something)

To prompt, compel, encourage, or plead with one to take some action. I was hesitant at first, but my wife urged me to testify. I urged her to write these stories down, as I was sure they'd make a great book.
See also: urge
References in classic literature ?
Korak felt an intuitive urge to rush to her protection.
* Women with impaired mobility take longer to reach the toilet, increasing the risk of leakage when the urge to urinate is strong
Participants also completed temptation assessments each time they felt an urge to smoke.
A conceptual Framework and Treatment Strategy for the Alcoholic Urge to Drink Utilizing Hypnosis.
Therefore, certain individuals who are presented an alcohol-related cue may re-experience, rather than merely remember, the altered state of awareness (e.g., intoxication, elevation in positive mood) associated with previous alcohol consumption and this may, in turn, facilitate increases in positive urge to drink (i.e., the desire to consume alcohol for its pleasant effects).
Furthermore, if, as previously suggested, re-experiencing altered states of awareness associated with previous alcohol use serves to increase alcohol cue-reactivity in regular drinkers, then perhaps the unusual experiences factor affects positive urge to drink.
The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the unusual experiences factor of boundaries and positive urge to drink, and whether altered state of awareness mediated (i.e., contributed to) this relationship.
Post scenario testing showed that being sedentary did nothing to reduce chocolate cravings, whereas doing a 15-minute walk reduced the urge to eat chocolate.
Overflow incontinence: people suffering from this do not feel the urge to urinate.
Urge Incontinence: people with UI cannot control the sudden urge to urinate and their bladders will contract to squeeze out urine whenever full.
It has been said that there is no stronger urge than the urge to edit someone else's writing.
The urge to drink, also often referred to as craving, is an emotional state in which a person is motivated to seek and use alcohol.
Researchers and clinicians have long considered the urge to drink (also commonly called craving) a key cause of relapse following alcoholism treatment.
People who ignore the urge to have a bowel movement may eventually stop feeling the urge, which can lead to constipation.
In addition, the urge to have a bowel movement should not be ignored.