upper story

upper story

The head or brain, as in He's not all there in the upper story. This expression transfers the literal sense of a higher floor in a multistory building to the top portion of the human body. Richard Bentley used it in A Dissertation on the Epistles of Phalaris (1699), where he compares a man with "brains ... in his head" to a man who has "furniture in his upper story."
See also: story, upper

upper story

verb
See also: story, upper
References in classic literature ?
And tapping with her heels, she ran quickly upstairs to see Vogel and his wife who lived on the upper story.
The houses have generally an upper story, built on account of the earthquakes, of plastered woodwork but some of the old ones, which are now used by several families, are immensely large, and would rival in suites of apartments the most magnificent in any place.
She waited until she was safe on the upper story, and then she looked over the banisters.
A delightful little stairway wound past more windows to the upper story.
The DUSTPAN SOCIETY will meet on Wednesday next, and parade in the upper story of the Club House.
He's empty enough i' the upper story, or he'd niver come jigging an' stamping i' that way, like a mad grasshopper, for the gentry to look at him.
But when Martin began to discuss eliminating the whole upper story of the house, Rose protested.
The upper story was of frame work, regularly covered with boards, and contained one room decently fitted up for the purpose of justice.
A yellow bar falling across the black foreground showed that the door was not quite closed, and one window in the upper story was brightly illuminated.
The far greater proportion of the building was occupied by the theatre, which filled almost the whole ground storey and was lighted from above, and by the cabinet, which formed an upper story at one end and looked upon the court.
Behind dingy blind and curtain, in upper story and garret, skulking more or less under false names, false hair, false titles, false jewellery, and false histories, a colony of brigands lie in their first sleep.
The possession of two of these, is supposed to compensate for the absence of so much air and exercise as can be had in the dull strip attached to each of the others, in an hour's time every day; and therefore every prisoner in this upper story has two cells, adjoining and communicating with, each other.
The upper story, like the ground floor, evidently consisted of two rooms only.
It had an upper story in which visitors were often lodged.
He was interrupted by a cry--a sound of lamentation--from the upper story of the house.
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