up to par

up to par

As good as what was expected, required, or demanded; satisfactory or adequate. A: "How's your dinner?" B: "It's up to par with this place's usual standard." It's nice to see that Jenny's work is up to par again lately.
See also: par, to, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

up to par

Fig. as good as the standard or average; up to standard. I'm just not feeling up to par today. I must be coming down with something. The manager said that the report was not up to par and gave it back to Mary to do over again.
See also: par, to, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

up to par

Also, up to scratch or snuff or speed or the mark . Satisfactory, up to a given standard, as in She didn't feel up to par today so she stayed home, or I'm sure he'll come up to scratch when the time comes, or She's up to snuff again. Nearly all the versions of this idiom come from sports, par from golf, scratch and mark from boxing (after being knocked down a fighter had eight seconds to make his way to a mark scratched in the center of the ring), and speed from racing. However, the allusion in the variant with snuff, which dates from the early 1800s, has been lost.
See also: par, to, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

up to par

at an expected or usual level or quality.
1989 Randall Kenan A Visitation of Spirits Why not him? Did he not look okay? Did he smell bad? Have bad breath? Were his clothes not up to par?
See also: par, to, up
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

par for the course

Just about average or typical. The term comes from golf, where par means the number of strokes set as a standard for a particular hole or for the entire course, a score not attained by the majority of players. The term was transferred to other activities in the 1920s, but often with a mildly derogatory or deprecatory connotation, as in “He’s nearly half an hour late; that’s just about par for the course.” To be up to par also means “to meet a standard or norm,” while below par means “less than satisfactory,” and by extension in poor spirits or health. Thus C. E. Montague (1867–1928) wrote (Fiery Particles), “I was born below par to the extent of two whiskies.”
See also: course, for, par
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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