unpack

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unpack

To try to understand and explicate a complex, and possibly controversial, statement, passage, etc. Who can unpack what the author is saying in this paragraph? When you unpack his statement, you start to see how bigoted it is.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bells have tolled for some major characters on 'Game of Thrones' and the team at 'I Know What You Binged Last SUmmer' is here to unpack the penultimate episode of the blockbuster HBO show.
Despite all the attention on his STOP staring, it's driving me bananas all eyes are on this rhesus macaque monkey after he unpacks his lunch box.
of Notre Dame) unpacks what is philosophically interesting about Allen's comedy.
For example, Tuin, 1998, unpacks and amplifies a (literally) pivotal scene from Rainer Werner Fassbinder's desolate view of marriage as sadomasochism, Martha (1974).
Director's Cut's double-screen projection appears to have been shot at a theater rehearsal of Sam Shepard's Fool for Love, another story about a relationship gone to hell, but there is more than one social dynamic to unpack here.
Clearing his mind of any connections to the present, Morley steps back into 19th-century New York, where he not only resolves some scientific questions, but neatly unpacks a murder mystery and discovers a life and romance more suited to his tastes.
In these chapters he unpacks the five middle axioms and looks to future indicators of our postindustrial economy as he shapes "a new logic of distribution." The book ends on a hopeful note that each of the middle axioms "represents an area of potential (though not yet full existing) normative agreement." They serve as "a partial agenda for future research into the normative bases and empirical consequences of social policy" (210-11).
As he again unpacks this talk for some incoherences and especially for concealed allegiance to a regulatory Shakespeare, Worthen is largely benevolent in his skepticism, granting serious purposes to self-descriptions and analyses of the actors, though sometimes noting their interpretive vulnerabilities - for instance, that the "eclectic feel" of some of their justifications and performances reminds one of that in the new historicism.
The storied approach explores the client's world through story development as a process of co-construction (i.e., to reveal), deconstruction (i.e., to unpack), and construction (i.e., to re-author).