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the most unkindest cut of all

The most hurtful or malicious thing that one could say to another. The phrase originated in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar in a description of Caesar's murder. Hearing my own mother attack my decision to adopt a child was the most unkindest cut of all.
See also: all, cut, most, of, unkind

doesn't have a (certain kind of) bone in (one's) body

Does not display the trait stated between "a" and "bone." (This phrase does not refer to an actual bone in the human skeleton.) I highly doubt that Jeannie started that vicious rumor about you—she doesn't have a mean bone in her body.
See also: body, bone, have, kind

the (most) unkindest cut (of all)

The most heartless, demoralizing, or treacherous action, remark, or outcome possible. A reference to a line in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, describing Caesar's death at the hands of his friends. But the unkindest cut was watching the man I considered my best friend move in with my ex-wife the second I moved out. Even my teachers stood there laughing at me. That was the most unkindest cut of all. Seeing such a beloved character turned into such an absurd parody of herself, well, that's the unkindest cut of all for longtime fans of the series.
See also: cut, unkind

unkindest cut

The worst insult, ultimate treachery, as in And then, the unkindest cut of all-my partner walks out on me just when the deal is about to go through . This expression was invented by Shakespeare in describing Julius Caesar's stabbing to death by his friends in Julius Caesar (3:2): "This was the most unkindest cut of all."
See also: cut, unkind

unkindest cut of all, (most)

The worst insult, the ultimate in treachery. This expression was used by Shakespeare to describe the assassination of Julius Caesar by his friends: “This was the most unkindest cut of all” (Julius Caesar, 3.2). It found its way into the proverb collections of James Howell, John Ray, and Thomas Fuller, which helped its long survival, although today most, which made it a double superlative, is usually omitted.
See also: cut, of, unkind
References in periodicals archive ?
But as he plots the Chairboys' precarious route to safety, Ainsworth's anxiety is tempered in the knowledge he cannot suffer an unkinder fate than hundreds in the Footballers' Battalion, as 17th Battalion the Middlesex Regiment were known.
WE'RE still getting about three dozen calls a day about Dialog - or Dialadog as some of our unkinder critics have called it.