underpinnings


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

underpinnings

n. the legs. He has good underpinnings—ought to be able to run faster. With underpinnings like that, he ought to be able to win the marathon.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order for us to decide where we fall on the spectrum of solutions, we first need to understand the underpinning issues affecting this debate.
Young has done the business world a great service by providing us with both the philosophical and practical underpinnings of the Caux Round Table's Principles for Business.
The first case, in South Africa, illustrates how a single microbial agent can undermine the economic, social, and medical underpinnings of a developed country.
Throughout, the author is correct in emphasizing theological underpinnings of depictions, equating the diseased body with heresy and the plague with divine retribution.
Livingston asks for a reexamination of these theological underpinnings and a rethinking of reconciliation, meaning re-conciliation with the community who is alienated by the violence rather than reunion with the battered.
But if it turns out the economic underpinnings exist for some materials but are absent with others, it's time to open up the books and acknowledge this.
They reminded us that our underpinnings are not static, that our planet is still evolving.
Managing editor Bill Geibler said the magazine "will expose real-world successes, as well as failures, and examine in detail the technical underpinnings of traditional and new economy firms, and the tools they use." Waldack said the title "will show what it takes to build and expand profitable businesses by leveraging the latest Internet technologies."
The theoretical underpinnings of Prendergast's arguments focus on changes in the Catholic population, in political party identification, and in the political environment.
Have these twin pillars been toppled and, if so, what is left to support the intellectual underpinnings of efforts to measure the macroeconomic direction of an economy?
While the first part of Negotiating Difference is at times overwhelmingly dense in its effort to map the development of "black male feminism," and Black Afro-Americanists' resistance to "caucacentric invasion," Awkward is at his best in the second half of his text, in which illuminating close readings offer acute insight into the discursive underpinnings of popular and traditional literary texts.
That he both employs and parodies the conventions and philosophical underpinnings of the Canadian documentary to do so gives his work a peculiar and winning combination of sobriety and subversion.
After runmaging through the archives of the two wars and their fiscal underpinnings -- and through much of the NAACP's records from the period -- he announces that: "War bonds both reflected and helped shape a new version of Americanism, steeped in the enduring paradox of `e pluribus unum,' out of many, one." In prose that is too often turgid, Samuel goes on to explain that whereas in the first war, bond drives centered on lining everybody up behind the dominant white idea, during the second war the bond sellers reflected the fact that the country had changed and so the selling was less nativist and more inclusive of the population, most notably of black Americans.
"The underpinnings of unsafe sex are cultural issues and, ultimately, homophobia, which drives same-gender sexual experience underground.
Luckily, most banks in the area currently maintain high capitalization levels and have strong financial underpinnings.