underground

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go underground

1. To conceal oneself in a hidden place or at a hidden location so as to avoid discovery or detection, especially by figures of authority. Many political dissidents have gone underground now that the government has begun its violent crackdown on opposing parties. The agent had to go underground after his cover was blown.
2. To operate or function without being detected by someone or something, especially a body or figures of authority. The distributors of the pro-socialist pamphlets seem to have gone underground ever since they started attracting the attention of the feds.
See also: go, underground

underground railroad

1. capitalized An organized network of secret workers, routes, and safe houses used to ferry escaped African-American slaves to free states or present-day Canada. A former slave herself, Harriet Tubman was an instrumental figure in the Underground Railroad, saving roughly 70 people from slavery over the course of 13 rescue missions.
2. By extension, any network of people working together secretly to help fugitives escape to places of safety and freedom. The human rights organization has begun operating an underground railroad in the third-world country to help human trafficking victims escape from bondage. A former slave herself, Harriet Tubman was an instrumental figure in the Underground Railroad

underground railroad

A secret network for moving and housing fugitives, as in There's definitely an underground railroad helping women escape abusive husbands. This term, dating from the first half of the 1800s, alludes to the network that secretly transported runaway slaves through the northern states to Canada. It was revived more than a century later for similar escape routes.

go underground

in. to go into hiding; to begin to operate in secret. The entire operation went underground, and we heard no more about it.
See also: go, underground
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to portions of the report summarized in this article, there are other sections that include basic information about the nation's power infrastructure and its growth, data about outages caused by storms, a comparison of the reliability of overhead and underground electric systems, state policies utility approaches to undergrounding, and undergrounding studies completed by several states.
The report concludes that while state commissions will continue to be pressured to study the feasibility of undergrounding electric facilities following major outage events, it is highly unlikely that any commission will ever mandate the complete undergrounding of any utility.
However, that does not mean that utilities, customers and commissions should not work together to develop under-grounding approaches where funding, resources and support are available and in agreement to support undergrounding projects.
For customers, improved aesthetics and the hope that underground electrical facilities will provide greatly enhanced electric reliability will continue to be the driver for their desire for undergrounding of utility facilities.
This study has demonstrated that utilities see value in and are open to undergrounding their overhead facilities.