under the weather


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Related to under the weather: stuffed to the gills
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under the weather

1. Mildly ill. Yeah, I was under the weather last week, but I'm feeling much better now.
2. Drunk. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You were really under the weather!
3. Suffering from a hangover. We were out celebrating Valerie's birthday last night—that's why we're all under the weather today.
See also: weather

under the weather

 
1. ill. I feel sort of under the weather today. Whatever I ate for lunch is making me feel a bit under the weather.
2. intoxicated. Daddy's had a few beers and is under the weather again. Wally's just a tad under the weather.
See also: weather

under the weather

Ailing, ill; also, suffering from a hangover. For example, She said she was under the weather and couldn't make it to the meeting. This expression presumably alludes to the influence of the weather on one's health. [Early 1800s] The same term is sometimes used as a euphemism for being drunk, as in After four drinks, Ellen was a bit under the weather.
See also: weather

under the weather

COMMON If you are under the weather, you are feeling ill. I'd been feeling a bit under the weather for a couple of weeks. She was suffering from stress and generally under the weather.
See also: weather

under the weather

1 slightly unwell. 2 in low spirits. informal
See also: weather

under the ˈweather

(informal) slightly ill, sick or depressed; not as well/cheerful as usual: She was off work for two weeks and she still seems a bit under the weather.
See also: weather

under the weather

1. mod. ill. Whatever I ate for lunch is making me feel a bit under the weather.
2. mod. alcohol intoxicated. Willy’s just a tad under the weather.
See also: weather

under the weather

1. Somewhat indisposed; slightly ill.
2. Slang
a. Intoxicated; drunk.
b. Suffering from a hangover.
See also: weather

under the weather

Unwell, out of sorts. This phrase is thought to allude to being under the influence of weather that causes one to feel ill. Oddly enough, several early appearances in print deny that it means genuinely ill, the sense in which it is generally used today. Thus, William Dunlap wrote (The Memoirs of a Water Drinker, 1836), “He seems a little under the weather, somehow; and yet he’s not sick.”
See also: weather