umbrage


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Related to umbrage: take umbrage

take umbrage

To become offended or angered by something. Hey, I take umbrage at the idea that I didn't put my full effort into this project.
See also: take, umbrage

take umbrage at (something)

To become offended or angered by something. Hey, I take umbrage at the idea that I didn't put my full effort into this project.
See also: take, umbrage

take umbrage at something

to feel that one has been insulted by something. The employee took umbrage at not getting a raise. Mary took umbrage at the suggestion that she was being unreasonable.
See also: take, umbrage

take umbrage

Feel resentment, take offense, as in Aunt Agatha is quick to take umbrage at any suggestion to do things differently. This expression features one of the rare surviving uses of umbrage, which now means "resentment" but comes from the Latin umbra, for "shade," and presumably alludes to the "shadow" of displeasure. [Late 1600s]
See also: take, umbrage

take ˈumbrage (at something)

(formal or humorous) be offended or angry because of something, often without a good reason: She took umbrage at my remarks about her hair.
See also: take, umbrage
References in periodicals archive ?
Cutter, like other Democrats, learned a hard truth back then: Umbrage doesn't win elections.
But it is that brother's wife, Herodias, who truly takes umbrage.
After the release of the AI report, Bush and several members of his administration immediately took umbrage at the claims.
Perkins took umbrage and sent out an e-mail with a rather unflattering photo of me.
While some say Dubai verges on being ridiculous, Jonathan Howell-Jones, a marketing official with Dubai Internet City who relocated from rainy Britain, takes umbrage.
Bennett took umbrage at this, not wanting to be mistaken for some reactionary.
Then he takes umbrage at the suggestion that some Palestinian refugees might settle in the countries where they have been living for the last 50 years.
Editor: As a retired professional forester, I take umbrage with the editorial by Ms.
As I climbed the 247 steep stone steps divided into four narrow tiers to the pyramid's summit, many of my fellow pilgrims expressed their umbrage at the new Wal-Mart, in plain sight down below, just 2,000 meters away.
I take no umbrage at your questioning his policies, but I feel that this editorial gives voters (and especially your the idea that a vote for Kerry be better than a vote for Mr.
Never ones to pass up an opportunity to be offended, these groups have risen up to take umbrage at the dolls' immoral lifestyle--proving yet again that nothing is too frivolous to escape their notice.
TEI took particular umbrage at the proposed strict liability penalty for failing to disclose reportable transactions, especially given the ambiguity and potential scope of "substantially similar" transactions that might fall under the rubric of reportable transactions.
Otherwise, noise and electronic music seem to have little to do with each other, and more often than not practitioners of one might take umbrage at the suggestion that they produce the other.
At one of the final previews of "Dance of the Vampires," three members of the audience took umbrage at Asa Somers' act-two turn as Count Von Krolock's gay vampire son, Herbert.
I take umbrage when the family is called dysfunctional.