umbrage


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Related to umbrage: take umbrage

take umbrage

To become offended or angered by something. Hey, I take umbrage at the idea that I didn't put my full effort into this project.
See also: take, umbrage

take umbrage at (something)

To become offended or angered by something. Hey, I take umbrage at the idea that I didn't put my full effort into this project.
See also: take, umbrage

take umbrage at something

to feel that one has been insulted by something. The employee took umbrage at not getting a raise. Mary took umbrage at the suggestion that she was being unreasonable.
See also: take, umbrage

take umbrage

Feel resentment, take offense, as in Aunt Agatha is quick to take umbrage at any suggestion to do things differently. This expression features one of the rare surviving uses of umbrage, which now means "resentment" but comes from the Latin umbra, for "shade," and presumably alludes to the "shadow" of displeasure. [Late 1600s]
See also: take, umbrage

take ˈumbrage (at something)

(formal or humorous) be offended or angry because of something, often without a good reason: She took umbrage at my remarks about her hair.
See also: take, umbrage
References in periodicals archive ?
Cutter, like other Democrats, learned a hard truth back then: Umbrage doesn't win elections.
As I climbed the 247 steep stone steps divided into four narrow tiers to the pyramid's summit, many of my fellow pilgrims expressed their umbrage at the new Wal-Mart, in plain sight down below, just 2,000 meters away.
Never ones to pass up an opportunity to be offended, these groups have risen up to take umbrage at the dolls' immoral lifestyle--proving yet again that nothing is too frivolous to escape their notice.
TEI took particular umbrage at the proposed strict liability penalty for failing to disclose reportable transactions, especially given the ambiguity and potential scope of "substantially similar" transactions that might fall under the rubric of reportable transactions.
Otherwise, noise and electronic music seem to have little to do with each other, and more often than not practitioners of one might take umbrage at the suggestion that they produce the other.
I take umbrage when the family is called dysfunctional.
His is a militant and uncompromising Afrocentricism which takes umbrage at any attempt to denigrate Black culture as inferior and unworthy.
Strauss admires the Catholic writers whose consolations he describes, and takes umbrage with scholars who do not express sympathetic appreciation for these persecuted "souls.
In addition to the collection of images published in Coming Back, an exhibition of Mario Tama's images will also be shown in New York at Umbrage Gallery (July 5 - September 15) to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.
But Lewisham West Labour MP Jim Dowd took umbrage when it arrived with his shepherd's pie at the Hare and Billet pub in Blackheath, South East London - because he had asked for Worcestershire sauce.
A fair percentage of MCC members, it seems, have taken umbrage at the leg room being proposed for their seats in the proposed new Warner Stand at the home of cricket, Lord's.
I TAKE acute umbrage at the survey that declared Glaswegians are Scotland's biggest liars.
Ridiculously, Sainsbury's has apologised for its employee taking umbrage at Ms Clarke's behaviour.
Ideas Should not be Shielded from Criticism If only people made the jump from "This is the Truth" to "This is an Idea that I strongly Believe in" in the way they thought about their religions, there would be much less umbrage and frivolous sensationalism.
Not Andrew Evans, who took umbrage when he found out Cardiff Castle had planned a rock concert featuring 10cc, above, on the same day he was to hold his reception in the banqueting hall.