uke

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Related to ukes: dukes

uke

and yuke (juk)
1. in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. (see also puke.) I think somebody yuked in the backseat, Tom.
2. n. vomit. (Collegiate.) Tell me that the stuff in the backseat isn’t uke!
References in periodicals archive ?
Three organizations joined together to sponsor the annual Uke Jam, Mueller said.
There appears to be no limit to what you can play on a uke, albeit in simplified version.
If you find your kids are learning uke in school at a session like the West Boylston ones, you might want to play along as well.
Even if none of the kids in the program becomes a uke master like Jake Shimabukuro, being able to play an instrument makes students feel good about themselves.
Sixth-grader Tim Wellette plans to use the uke as a springboard for learning rock music's traditional centerpiece: the electric guitar.
Today's uke, which looks like a tiny guitar, grew out of the braguinha, a four-stringed instrument that made its way from Portugal to the Hawaiian Islands in the late 19th century.
His regular models sell for $139 to $199 each; he's building a custom uke for a Eugene client for $400, and has a baritone uke on order for $1,100.
The first uke he made, which hangs in a closet-sized shop in his Eugene home, took him a year to construct.
Check out the clips of James Hill and John King (leading uke exponents) on YouTube if you doubt me on this."
Nick also runs the Cardiff Ukulele Cabaret, an open mic night for uke players at Gwdihw, usually based around a theme.
The uke auteur reveals he has plans to grow his ukulele nights.
This year, uke groups expected to perform 20-minute sets are from North Eugene High (directed by Aaron Thomas) and Ridgeline Montessori (directed by Jon Labrousse), as well as groups from Cesar Chavez Elementary and St.
Berkeley, a veteran of Ship Room uke events, says we can expect the unexpected.
It was all so much fun that Leufstedt is about to do it over again, this time in a bigger space so that all the uke's newfound fans can fit in.
Among those fanning the flames of the ukulele trend was the late Israel Kamakawiwo'ole, a Hawaiian uke player with an outsized talent who had a hit with his touchingly ingenuous rendition of "Over the Rainbow." When "American Idol" heartthrob Jason Castro covered Iz's version, show judges applauded and armies of his fans went into a downloading frenzy.