two-faced

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Related to two-facedness: insincere

two-faced

Duplicitous; habitually presenting a different version of oneself at different times, especially in the presence of different people. Terri is about as two-faced as they come, always giving me a big hug and then talking about me as soon as I walk away. It's not surprising that politicians are so two-faced, but that people buy their phony facades.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As Willson puts it, "he stood on the periphery of them, understanding their general drift, and was introduced to the subtle courses of a double diplomacy." (59) And James soon acquired a nasty reputation for two-facedness. Elizabeth, for instance, exclaimed with no end of annoyance: "That false Scotch urchin!
Rowland, unhappy with the political explanation, locates the failure in the essential two-facedness of epideictic rhetoric, whose aims are given by Aristotle as 'praising and dispraising'.
So while it is beyond doubt that Grainger was capable both of genuine praise of others and of modesty regarding himself, as well as great generosity (his letter to the ailing Cecil Sharp, regarding the transference of royalties of Country Gardens, is typical), there is more than enough two-facedness and bigotry in this collection to cast serious doubt on John Bird's contention that, 'despite the apparent inconsistencies of his thinking and the abnormalities of his psychological make-up, [Grainger] was, nonetheless, a man of total integrity' (Percy Grainger, London, 1976, p.
"Two-facedness: Cultural Ambivalence and the Unveiling of Anglo-Centric Narratives in Jamaica Kincaid's Fiction." Unpublished paper presented at the ACLALS conference, Kingston, Jamaica, August 1992.
Some missives from United Services College follow (.the original of the school in Stalky & Co), where we learn with surprise that the boys in 1882 were "intensely amused" at the attempt on Queen Victoria's life: "I'm afraid we are scarcely loyal and patriotic enough" says Kipling, evidently being one who laughed, the two-facedness registered here foreshadowing that ambivalent loyalty which marks his references to the Widow of Windsor.
Yet she finds McGinniss guilty of "crude and gratuitous two-facedness." Next, in an Afterword" that did not appear in The New Yorker, Malcolm admits to still another parallel between her career and that of McGinniss.
"If we rid the British isles of Two-Facedness (a reference to Batman villian Two Face) then who knows where it could end?
She said: "This is the ultimate in two-facedness. Talk about the pot calling the kettle black.
Titular figures' respective Yankee pluck and propriety-mocking primitivism are typed from the start; ditto the Baron's two-facedness, the Duchess' decadent cruelty, etc., despite decent turns from all involved.