twice


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cheap at twice the price

Remarkably or exceedingly inexpensive (as in, even if you doubled the price, it would still be a good value). Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I got a brand new three-piece suit for 50 bucks—cheap at twice the price!
See also: cheap, price, twice

once or twice

Only a few times. A: "Have you ever been to Chinatown in New York?" B: "Once or twice; not enough to really get to know the place."
See also: once, twice

a stopped clock is right twice a day

Even people who are usually wrong can be right sometimes, even if just by accident. From the idea that the stationary hands of a broken clock will still display the correct time at two points during the 24-hour cycle. I know you're sick of Gran's lectures and think she's out of touch, but you can learn a lot from her. Just keep in mind that even a stopped clock is right twice a day! A: "You know how I feel about the president, but even I think he's right this time." B: "Even a stopped clock is right twice a day."
See also: clock, right, stop, twice

buy cheap, buy twice

If something is inexpensive, it is probably poorly made or will wear out quickly (and one will have to purchase it again). A: "I need to save some money, so I think I'm just going to buy this cheap cell phone." B: "I'd be wary if I were you. You'll probably end up spending more money—buy cheap, buy twice, and all that."
See also: buy, twice

measure twice and cut once

An axiom that encourages careful first steps in order to avoid extra work later on. I have to go back to the store because I cut the wrong size out of my last piece of material. "Measure twice and cut once" should be my new motto!
See also: and, cut, measure, once, twice

measure twice, cut once

An axiom that encourages careful first steps in order to avoid extra work later on. I have to go back to the store because I cut the wrong size out of my last piece of material. "Measure twice, cut once" should be my new motto!
See also: cut, measure, once

lightning doesn't strike twice

Something that's very extraordinary and unlikely to happen will never happen to the same person twice. (Said especially of tragic or unfortunate events.) I know you're scared to go back on a plane after that crash, but lightning doesn't strike twice.
See also: lightning, strike, twice

not think twice about (something)

To do something without worrying or stopping to consider the consequences, perhaps hastily and recklessly. She didn't think twice about getting on the train and going to Spain with him. When life gives you great opportunities, you can't think twice about seizing hold of them.
See also: not, think, twice

once bitten, twice shy

Once one is hurt by someone or something, one will be extra cautious to avoid that person or thing. I've learned my lesson from dating actors—once bitten, twice shy. The company's brief but disastrous attempt was enough for them to vow never to venture into the mobile phone market again. Once bitten, twice shy.
See also: once, shy, twice

think twice

To reconsider, be cautious about, or thoroughly contemplate something before committing to it. I'm going to sue them for everything they're worth—maybe then they'll think twice about trying to steal my ideas! Maybe we should think twice about investing so much money in a project we know so little about.
See also: think, twice

be twice the man/woman that (someone) is

To be far superior to someone else. Why didn't they give me that promotion instead? I'm twice the man that Joe is!
See also: man, that, twice, woman

twice over

Twice; two times in a row. Usually used to emphasize that something is excessive or has an excessive effect. The student had enough alcohol in his system to kill a person twice over. Having to deal with the insurance company after my husband's death has made me suffer twice over.
See also: over, twice

lightning never strikes (the same place) twice

Something that's very extraordinary and unlikely to happen will never happen to the same person twice. (Said especially of tragic or unfortunate events.) I know you're scared to go back on a plane after that crash, but lightning never strikes twice. There's no way we could get hit by such a devastating storm like that again—lightning never strikes the same place twice

lightning never strikes twice in the same place

Something that's very extraordinary and unlikely to happen will never happen to the same person twice. (Said especially of tragic or unfortunate events.) I know you're scared to go back on a plane after that crash, but lightning never strikes twice in the same place. There's no way we could get hit by such a devastating storm like that again—lightning never strikes twice in the same place.

Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me.

You should be hesitant to trust someone who has already tricked you. Is Ralph just going to pop out from behind that door again? Come on, fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me.
See also: fool, on, shame

*big as life (and twice as ugly)

 and *large as life (and twice as ugly); bigger than life (and twice as ugly)
Cliché a colorful way of saying that a person or a thing appeared, often surprisingly or dramatically, in a particular place. (*Also: as ~.) The little child just stood there as big as life and laughed very hard. I opened the door, and there was Tom as large as life. I came home and found this cat in my chair, as big as life and twice as ugly.
See also: big, life

Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me.

Prov. After being tricked once, one should be wary, so that the person cannot trick you again. Fred: Would you like a can of peanuts? Jane: The last can of peanuts you gave me had a toy snake in it. Fred: This one really is peanuts. Jane: Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me.
See also: fool, on, shame

He gives twice who gives quickly.

Prov. When someone asks you for something, it is more helpful to give something right away than to wait, even if you might be able to give more if you waited. Morris didn't have all the money his sister asked for, but he sent what he had immediately, knowing that he gives twice who gives quickly.
See also: give, he, quickly, twice, who

Lightning never strikes (the same place) twice.

Prov. The same highly unlikely thing never happens to the same person twice. Jill: I'm scared to drive ever since that truck hit my car. Alan: Don't worry. Lightning never strikes the same place twice. It's strange, but I feel safer since my apartment was robbed; I figure lightning never strikes the same place twice.

Once bitten, twice shy.

Prov. When something or someone has hurt you once, you tend to avoid that thing or person. Jill: Let's go ride the roller coaster. Jane: No, thanks. I got really sick on one of those once—once bitten, twice shy. I once sent in money for something I saw advertised in the back of a magazine, but the merchandise was of such poor quality I was sorry I'd bought it. I'll never buy anything that way again; once bitten, twice shy.
See also: once, shy, twice

think twice about someone or something

to give careful consideration to someone or something. Ed may be a good choice, but I suggest that you think twice about him. You will want to think twice about it.
See also: think, twice

think twice (before doing something)

to consider carefully whether one should do something; to be cautious about doing something. You should think twice before quitting your job. That's a serious decision, and you should certainly think twice.
See also: think, twice

big as life

Also, large as life. In person, as in And there was Mary, big as life, standing right in front of me. This phrase transfers the same size as in real life (life-size) to an actual appearance. Sometimes this term is embellished with and quite as natural, presumably alluding to a likeness of a person or thing that closely resembles the real thing. A similar addition is and twice as natural, which doesn't make sense. [Late 1800s]
2. Also, larger than life; big as all outdoors. On a grand scale, as in The soap opera could well be called a larger-than-life drama, or That friend of his was as big as all outdoors. This phrase can be used either literally, for larger than life-size (second example) or figuratively. The phrase all outdoors has been used to compare something or someone to an immensity since the early 1800s.
See also: big, life

cheap at twice the price

Very inexpensive, a good value for the money. For example, Pete got a $3,000 rebate on his new car-it was cheap at twice the price. For a synonym see dirt cheap.
See also: cheap, price, twice

lightning never strikes twice in the same place

The same misfortune will never recur, as in Go ahead and try your luck investing in options again; lightning never strikes twice. This saying is based on a long-standing myth, which has been proved to be untrue. Nevertheless, it is so well known it is often shortened, as in the example. [Mid-1800s]

once bitten, twice shy

Once hurt, one is doubly cautious in the future, as in He was two days late last time, so she's not hiring him again-once bitten, twice shy. This seemingly old observation, presumably alluding to an animal biting someone, was first recorded in 1894.
See also: once, shy, twice

think twice

1. Reconsider something, weigh something carefully, as in I've got to think twice before spending that much on a car. [Late 1800s]
2. not think twice. Take no notice, not worry about, as in She didn't think twice about flying off to Europe with a day's notice. [Mid-1900s]
See also: think, twice

once bitten, twice shy

or

once bitten

You say once bitten, twice shy to mean that a bad experience makes you not want to become involved in a similar situation in the future. I'm certainly not looking for a new boyfriend. Once bitten, twice shy. Tokyo's punters, once bitten, twice shy, will not come rushing back for more.
See also: once, shy, twice

lightning doesn't strike twice

or

lightning never strikes twice

You say that lightning does not strike twice or lightning never strikes twice to say that someone who has been very lucky or unlucky is unlikely to have the same good or bad luck again. They say lightning doesn't strike twice but it did with Wanganeen following up his match-winning form with another great performance. It was as if Sara was somehow protected by the old `lightning never strikes twice' rule. Note: You can also say that lightning strikes twice or that lightning strikes again when someone does have the same good or bad luck again. Lightning struck twice as he scored again — his fifth goal in three games over the Christmas period. Then, several years later, lightning struck again. Her other son Stephen died suddenly at the age of 13.
See also: lightning, strike, twice

think twice

COMMON If you think twice about doing something, you consider it again and usually decide not to do it. She'd better shut her mouth and from now on think twice before saying stupid things. If they don't enjoy the experience, they will think twice before they visit again. Note: If you say that someone doesn't think twice or wouldn't think twice about doing something, you mean that they would do it without hesitating. Plenty of villains don't think twice about hitting a woman.
See also: think, twice

lightning never strikes twice

the same calamity never occurs twice.
This expression refers to the popular belief that lightning never strikes the same spot twice.
1983 Penelope Lively Perfect Happiness It's nasty, isn't it?…Having to go to the same airport. Though in a way you can't help thinking well lightning never strikes twice.

once bitten, twice shy

a bad experience makes you wary of the same thing happening again.
This expression dates from the late 19th century. A variant common in the USA is once burned, twice shy .
See also: once, shy, twice

think twice

consider a course of action carefully before embarking on it.
See also: think, twice

be twice the man or woman that someone is

be much better or stronger than someone.
See also: man, someone, that, twice, woman

ˌlightning never strikes (in the same place) ˈtwice

(saying) an unusual or unpleasant event is not likely to happen in the same place or to the same person twice

ˌonce ˈbitten, ˌtwice ˈshy

(saying) if something has gone wrong once, you are very careful not to let something similar happen again: ‘Will she marry again, do you think?’ ‘I doubt it — once bitten, twice shy.’
See also: once, shy, twice

ˌonce or ˈtwice

a few times: I don’t know her well, I’ve only met her once or twice.
See also: once, twice

(not) think ˈtwice about something/about doing something

(not) think carefully before deciding to do something; (not) hesitate: You should think twice about employing someone you’ve never met.If they offered me a job abroad, I wouldn’t think twice about taking it!
See also: something, think, twice

be ˈtwice the man/woman (that somebody is)

be much better, stronger, healthier, etc. than somebody or than before: How dare you criticize him? He’s twice the man that you are!
See also: man, twice, woman

twice ˈover

not just once but twice: There was enough of the drug in her stomach to kill her twice over.
See also: over, twice

cheap at twice the price

Extremely inexpensive.
See also: cheap, price, twice

think twice

To weigh something carefully: I'd think twice before spending all that money on clothes.
See also: think, twice

once bitten, twice shy

One injury will make one extra cautious in the future. This proverbial saying appears to date from the mid-nineteenth century, although the idea is centuries older. William Scarborough’s version of Chinese Proverbs (1875) stated, “Once bitten by a snake in passing by, a second time he will of grass be shy.”
See also: once, shy, twice

think twice, to

To consider carefully before speaking or acting. It is an old idea, but this particular expression of it did not become widely used until the late nineteenth century. In his poem “Think Twice” (ca. 1885), Eugene F. Ware wrote, “Results are often grevious When people get too previous; ‘Think twice’ is good advice.”
See also: think
References in periodicals archive ?
Greenside triumphed 4-2 at Westfield Social, Lewis Teasdale notching twice and Tomas Bains the Westfield scorer.
Row 9: K2, yo, k3, yo, k1, yo, [ssk] twice, *[k2tog] twice, yo, k1, yo, k2, yo, k1, yo, [ssk] twice; rep from * to last 10 sts, [k2tog] twice, yo, k1, yo, k3, yo, k2.
Total sales for the 100 largest electronics retailers topped $130 billion in 2014, but were essentially flat for the third year in a row, the TWICE report shows.
From 20 June 2011 the airline will begin two times a week services between Forti-Bologna and Tirgu Mures and on 27 March twice weekly services between Bari and Bucharest will start.
Dictionaries, be they twice as awful as many are, could scarcely improve (worsen) on the OED's ingenuous comment in its entry for twice: "in all senses now the regular substitute for the phrase two times".
For acute complaints take 2000mg twice daily with food reducing to 1000mg once improvement sets in.
Twice - it is frowned upon to rear-end the instructor's Buick in the parking lot
When the researchers combined the observed velocities with previous measurements of the galaxies' motion along the line of sight, they concluded that the galaxies are traveling at about twice the speed previously estimated.
Lucia Patterson scored twice as Cannock drew 2-2 at Nottingham and Lucy Spencer's penalty corner earnt them a 1-1 draw with Belper.
The plant now runs a single shift and processes twice as much OCC, Swan says.
So don't even think twice about yet another sweet "Anatomy," featuring yet another hysterical idea.
Try nonprescription strength H2 receptor blockers (Zantac or Pepcid) taken before running and up to twice a day
Those in the control group received 3 mg/kg iron sulfate twice daily, up to 60 mg/dose for 6 weeks.
DUNCAN FERGUSON'S short righthook in midweek needs no comment from me, but I do think it would be unjust if he was punished twice for what amounts to the same crime.