tweedledee and tweedledum

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tweedledee and tweedledum

Any two people very similar in appearance, manner, or behavior, especially those who are or act particularly oafish or foolish. A reference to the names of two fictional twins in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There. It's a wonder we have any nice things at all with tweedledee and tweedledum over there running around the house knocking into everything. Most of the world sees our two countries as tweedledee and tweedledum, but we generally hate being lumped in with our boorish neighbors to the south.

tweedledum and tweedledee

Two matters, persons, or groups that are very much alike, as in Bob says he's not voting in this election because the candidates are tweedledum and tweedledee . This term was invented by John Byrom, who in 1725 made fun of two quarreling composers, Handel and Bononcini, and said there was little difference between their music, since one went "tweedledum" and the other "tweedledee." The term gained further currency when Lewis Carroll used it for two fat little men in Through the Looking-Glass (1872). For a synonym, see six of one, half dozen of the other.

tweedledum and tweedledee

Not much difference between these alternatives; same as six of one and half a dozen of the other. These actually were two names invented by John Byrom, who was satirizing two quarreling schools of musicians. Byrom (and others) claimed there was not much difference between Handel and Bononcini—one’s music went “tweedledum” and the other’s “tweedledee”—and wrote an amusing verse to this effect for the London Journal (June 1725). Lewis Carroll’s use of the names for two fat little men in his Through the Looking-Glass (1872) helped the term to survive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diana, Henry and Emily grill Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum Mrs Nealings and Mrs Higgins are the Head and Deputy Head teachers at St.
Also missing are Tweedle-Dee and Tweedle-Dum, who were not in "Alice in Wonderland" but in the companion story, "Through the Looking-Glass."
Thus, Douglas Amy contends that the SMD electoral system produces virtually meaningless choices among "tweedle-dee and tweedle-dum" candidates nominated by parties committed to avoiding any substantive discussions of important political issues (1993, 5).
Were diversification of the legislature to mean anything, it would need to be accompanied by a strengthening of party organizations in order to spare us the travails of "tweedle-dee and tweedle-dum" candidates and enable the newly represented groups to present and pursue their agendas effectively.