turn into

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turn into

1. To take a turn leading into some place or thing. We turned into a dark alleyway to avoid the police. I don't like the sounds coming from the engine. Turn into that service station so we can see if anything is wrong.
2. To cause someone or something to take a turn leading into some place or thing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "turn" and "into." I managed to turn the car into an empty field so as not to cause a major accident on the highway.
3. To change or transform into some other form. This sofa turns into a bed, so there is a place for you to sleep tonight if you need to stay over. The caterpillar turns into a butterfly after it comes out of its cocoon.
4. To change in nature, character, or behavior. You've turned into a real jerk since you became rich!
5. To change or transform someone or something into some other state or form. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "turn" and "into." They've turned this abandoned warehouse into a wonderful art gallery. The witch in the story turns the princess into a hideous beast.
6. To change someone's nature, character, or behavior. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "turn" and "into." The allure of total power can turn even the most altruistic leader into a tyrant. Years of poverty and mistreatment has turned him into quite the bitter, cynical person.
See also: turn

turn someone or something into someone or something

to change someone or something into someone or something else. The magician tried to turn Ginny into a robin. She turned the parrot into a dove.
See also: turn

turn into someone or something

to change into someone or something. After work is over, he turns into a fairly nice person. The room turned into a very pleasant place when the lights were dimmed.
See also: turn

turn into

v.
1. To direct one's way or course into something: The truck turned into the gas station.
2. To cause someone or something to take on some character, nature, identity, or appearance; change or transform someone or something into someone or something: The designer turned a rundown house into a show place. We turned the spare room into a nursery.
3. To change into something or someone; become transformed into something or someone: The night turned into day. In the story, straw turns into gold.
4. To convert something into something: The singers turned their talent into extra money.
5. To pour, let fall, or otherwise release something into some receptacle: The chef turned the soup into the dish.
See also: turn
References in periodicals archive ?
This Government are turning us into a third world country.
NEWS WILLIAMS FARMHOUSE A charming English country seat MOSELEY STALWART Victorian home's proud heritage ISSUE 148 FRIDAY OCTOBER 9 2009 Property Magazine Inside an idyllic Tudor country retreat with every conceivable extra LAVISH TUDOR OPULENCE The Old Castle cherishes its roots in the 1600s E D G B A S T O N H A R B O R N E H E R E F O R D S H I R E S TA F F O R D S H I R E S O L I H U L L WARWICKSHIRESHROPSHIRESTOURBRIDGEWORCESTERSHIRE BUSINESS SECTORS Personal Finance Is the sight of politicians promising to spend oodles more money that we havn't got slowly turning us into a nation of savers?
EATING out is turning us into a nation of fatties, researchers have claimed.
It seems to me that he is turning us into another Valencia.
Editor-in-chief Jane Bruton said: "The economic climate is turning us into more responsible, savvy shoppers."
THE average British driver spends the equivalent of 15 days a year sitting in their car -- and that is turning us into a nation of car couch potatoes, reckons internet car retailer jam jar cars.
Feathered lashes and we're ready to roll.Didi and Dinah sit tight as the make up girls do their thing - Turning us into futuristic androids.
That is no reason why we should torment ourselves with a sense of our own fearful helplessness at being unable to prevent modern-day, high-tech superstitions from turning us into neurotic wrecks.
He concludes that the nation is on the edge of dissolution: that regional and professional loyalties are overwhelming the national idea, turning us into "an empire...a subtle, ambiguous one of geographically determined, loosely connected posturban forms; a dry-land version of city-state Greece, in which ruthless economic competition replaces ancient wars."
Resident Pat McFall added: "If the political situation changes then they might cut off Kirkwoods Road, effectively turning us into human shields."