turn in

(redirected from turning in)

turn in

1. To go to one's bed to sleep. I have to be up at 6 AM, so I'll need turn in early tonight.
2. To point, curve, or fold inwards. The edges of the TV turn in to offer the viewer a more immersive viewing experience. My feet turn in slightly, which makes it awkward to dance.
3. To point, curve, or fold something inwards. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "turn" and "in." He turned in the two computer monitors so that he could see both at the same time. She turned her knees in to rest the plate on top of them.
4. To submit or hand in something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "turn" and "in." I had to turn the paper in late because of my grandfather's funeral. She turned in the lost wallet at the local police station.
5. To surrender, deliver, or give information about someone or oneself to the authorities, typically the police. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "turn" and "in." I was so wracked with guilt over the accident that I turned myself in to police. I decided to turn in my neighbor when I suspected him of the murder.
See also: turn

turn someone or something in (to someone or something)

to submit or refer someone or something to someone or a group, especially in some official capacity. The good citizen turned his neighbor in for watering his lawn during the wrong hours. I turned in the report to the treasurer.
See also: turn

turn in (some place)

 and turn into (some place)
to walk or steer one's vehicle into a place. Turn into the next service station for some gas. I'll turn in for gas now. She walked down the street and turned into the drugstore.
See also: turn

turn in

 
1. [for something] to fold or point inward. Do my toes turn in too much? The legs of the table turned in at the bottom, giving a quaint appearance to the piece of furniture.
2. [for someone] to go to bed. It's time to turn in. Good night. I want to turn in early tonight.
See also: turn

turn in

1. Hand in, give over, as in I turned in my exam and left the room. [c. 1300]
2. Surrender or inform on, especially to the police, as in The shoplifter turned herself in. [1920s]
3. Produce, as in He turned in a consistent performance every day. [Mid-1900s]
4. Go to bed, as in I turned in early last night. [Colloquial; late 1600s]
See also: turn

turn in

v.
1. To deliver or submit some assignment or work: I turned my application in before the deadline. That actor turns in a consistent performance every show.
2. To inform on or deliver someone or something to an authority: I turned in the wallet that I found to the police. The criminals turned themselves in.
3. To go to bed: I turned in early last night.
See also: turn

turn in

and roll in
in. to go to bed. Well, it’s about time to turn in.
See also: turn
References in periodicals archive ?
WAH CANTT -- Senior Pakistan Musluim League-Nawaz leader Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan Saturday expressed his concern over growing protests and said the politics of 'dharna' (sit-ins) should now end to save the country turning in to a 'banana republic'.
In other words, you're finding problems that don't exist and then turning in a perfectly good tube for disposal.
Before the advent of the RSY, SSAs were the primary means of supply support for requisitioning and turning in serviceable and unserviceable supplies and repair parts.
Further, organizations turning in unserviceable RIW items should receive credit (upon turn-in) at the exchange price (not charged for contractor repair of the item).
eRMS does a better job identifying carcasses since the program is tied directly to NAVICP's Master Item File (MIF) which prevents ships from turning in the wrong retrograde using other programs such as FEDLOG or HAYSTACK.
Samuel Chavez of Glendale, who was sworn in eight months after turning in his citizenship application, praised the NQP program for weeding out criminals.
But when units order ASV assets without turning in their unserviceable ones, it puts a strain on the system.