turn against (someone or something)

(redirected from turned him against)

turn against (someone or something)

1. To defy, revolt against, or become antagonistic toward someone or something. The majority of his supporters turned against him after he failed to keep his election promises. Polls indicate that voters have turned against the proposed legislation.
2. To make or cause someone or something to defy, revolt against, or become antagonistic toward someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "turn" and "against." The company's unscrupulous move has turned even their most loyal customers against them. Can't you see that he's trying to turn Jim against you?
See also: turn

turn someone or something against someone or something

to cause someone to defy or revolt against someone or something; to make someone antagonistic toward someone or something. He turned the whole board against Molly. She turned the city council against the proposed law.
See also: turn

turn against

Become or make antagonistic to, as in Adolescents often turn against their parents, but only temporarily, or She turned him against his colleagues by telling him they were spying on him. [First half of 1800s]
See also: turn

turn against

v.
1. To change one's actions or attitudes to be against someone or something; become hostile or antagonistic toward someone or something: The peasants turned against the cruel ruler.
2. To cause someone or something to act or go against someone or something; make someone or something antagonistic toward someone or something: The scandal turned public opinion against the candidate. They turned my family against me.
See also: turn
References in classic literature ?
You've turned him against me from the day he was born.
He doubted whether to pursue the son of Jove, or to make slaughter of the Lycian rank and file; it was not decreed, however, that he should slay the son of Jove; Minerva, therefore, turned him against the main body of the Lycians.
London, September 24 ( ANI ): In private diaries to be published for the first time next month, Richard Burton condemned one of Britain's greatest actresses, Dame Maggie Smith, as 'dull' and 'plain' - and complained that her performances had 'turned him against sex'.
During the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965), the theologian served as secretary of the commission that drafted the Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World (Gaudium et spes), from which he derived a "theology of experience" which shortly thereafter turned him against the traditional Church teaching on marriage, which he began to attack as "legalistic."