turnabout


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Related to turnabout: Turnabout is fair play

turnabout is fair play

1. It is fair for each person to have the opportunity to do something. Let your little brother play the video game now. Come on, turnabout is fair play.
2. It is fair for someone to suffer the pain that they have inflicted on others. If you start rumors about other people, they'll eventually do the same thing to you. Turnabout is fair play, after all.
See also: fair, play, turnabout

Turnabout is fair play.

Prov. It is fair for one to suffer whatever one has caused others to suffer. So, you don't like being made fun of! Well, turnabout is fair play.
See also: fair, play, turnabout

turnabout is fair play

Taking alternate or successive turns at doing something is just and equitable. For example, Come on, I want to sit in the front seat now-turnabout is fair play. This justification for taking turns was first recorded in 1755.
See also: fair, play, turnabout

turn the tables, to

To reverse the situation between two persons or groups, especially so as to gain the upper hand. This term comes from the custom of reversing the table or board in games like chess and draughts, so that the opponents’ relative positions are switched. It was being used figuratively as long ago as 1612, when George Chapman wrote (The Widow’s Tears, 1.3), “I may turn the tables with you ere long.” Another cliché with the same meaning is turnabout is fair play, which dates from the nineteenth century. Robert Louis Stevenson used it in one of his last works, The Wrecker (1892): “You had your chance then; seems to me it’s mine now. Turn about’s fair play.”
See also: turn
References in periodicals archive ?
The opposition fears a turnabout in Veles as it happened in 2009.
And, just by this simple action we may be able to reverse the 'turnabout.' Fai lure to do so is just not worth contemplating."
Although seen as a political turnabout, potential for real progress is low as tensions - and sharp words - continue to escalate.
WHILE the Northern Ireland economy appears to be on the verge of a massive upward turnabout, greyhound sport in the area is going in the opposite direction.
Then in a turnabout of circumstances, Wilson ordered Dotson from the car, pulled his own gun, and, feeling threatened, shot Dotson in the knee.
That represents a startling turnabout from the pattern seen in recent decades, when the U.S.
To quote the review of the hardcover in KLIATT, November 2000: In the year 2000, two feisty elderly women are among the nursing home residents selected to be in a scientific experiment called Project Turnabout. Melly and Anny Beth receive an injection that miraculously reverses the aging process.
At one stage the Tigers trailed 6-3 but Gursev Singh's second half hat-trick signalled a remarkable turnabout.
The victory propels Spurs into the top half of the table - a remarkable turnabout by boss Martin Jol in less than a month ago since Spurs suffered their sixth straight league defeat.
Philip Parry levelled just before the interval and further goals from Ashley Wood (65) and Phil Goodwin (75) completed the turnabout.
IT WAS A SHOCKING TURNABOUT OF 30 YEARS OF OFFICIAL policy in April when President Bush abruptly embraced Ariel Sharons "plan" for peace in the Middle East.
WINNIPEG -- Turnabout, Canada's only provincewide pilot project for children under 12 who come into conflict with the law will be permanent, Attorney General Gord Mackintosh and Healthy Living Minister Jim Rondeau announced.
When it comes to propaganda, it appears that turnabout is fair play.
This will bring the index to within 10% of the exaggerated 2000 peak that likely will be reached in 2005,The initial turnabout is being driven by capacity additions in motor vehicles and warehouses, mostly on the West Coast, for the surge in,asian trade.