turn (one's) head

(redirected from turn their heads)

turn (one's) head

1. To avoid paying attention to something uncomfortable, undesirable, unsafe, or inconvenient. We all knew that what the board of directors was doing was wrong, but we all just turned our heads because we were still profiting from it. Everyone turned their heads when we raised concerns years ago, and look at what happened as a result!
2. To cause someone to suddenly become fixated or infatuated. She spent all summer exercising and changing her eating habits, and she turned everyone's heads when she came back to school that fall.
3. To cause someone to become arrogant, conceited, or self-important. He's a pretty mediocre writer, but getting published in that literary journal seems to have turned his head.
See also: head, turn

turn someone's head

Fig. [for flattery or success] to distract someone; to cause someone not to be sensible. Don't let our praise turn your head. You're not perfect! Her successes had turned her head. She was now quite arrogant.
See also: head, turn

turn one's head

1. Cause to become infatuated, as in The new teacher turned all the girls' heads. [Mid-1800s]
2. Cause to become conceited, as in Winning that prize has turned his head. A 16th-century translator of Seneca used this phrase: "His head was turned by too great success" ( Ad Lucullus, 1571).
See also: head, turn

turn someone's head

make someone conceited.
See also: head, turn

turn somebody’s ˈhead

(of success, praise, etc.) make a person feel too proud in a way that other people find annoying: You’d better stop giving me all these compliments, or you’ll turn my head!
See also: head, turn
References in periodicals archive ?
I SUSPECT most people turn their heads at this time of year to see the floral displays outside the recently refurbished magnificent Maltsters Arms, with its quality garden furniture aimed at luring passers by.
Additional trials allowed volunteers to turn their heads, combining neck sensations with motor commands for head turns.
In unison, they turn their heads to the left, where six soap bubbles arrange themselves against a stone block wall like whole notes on a staff.
Physicians generally assume that healthy infants will turn their heads to get air when their bedding threatens suffocation, and "posture is thus considered coincidental" in the sudden deaths of infants found with their faces straight down, the researchers say.
In their first experiment, the researchers conditioned 16 infants to turn their heads toward a loudspeaker when the prototype for one vowel category (the long "e" in the word "peep") changed to another vowel prototype (the short "e" in the word "pep").
Half the group learned to turn their heads in response to the prototype for the long "e" sound; the rest were conditioned to turn their heads in response to a poor representative of the same vowel category.
For instance, most infants prefer to turn their heads and bodies to the right (SN: 1/7/89, p.