turn the corner


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turn the corner

To begin to find success or improvement after a particularly difficult or troubling period. I know that rehab has been hard on you, but I feel like you've been really turning the corner lately. Their new startup took a couple of years to get going, but they turned the corner when their product was featured in a high-profile tech magazine.
See also: corner, turn

turn the corner

Fig. to pass a critical point in a process. The patient turned the corner last night. She should begin to show improvement now. The project has turned the corner. The rest should be easy.
See also: corner, turn

turn the corner

Pass a milestone or critical point, begin to recover. For example, Experts say the economy has turned the corner and is in the midst of an upturn, or The doctor believes he's turned the corner and is on the mend. This expression alludes to passing around the corner in a race, particularly the last corner. [First half of 1800s]
See also: corner, turn

turn the corner

If someone or something turns the corner, they begin to recover from a serious illness or a difficult situation. It's been a nasty, long illness but I think he's finally turned the corner. Has California's economy finally turned the corner? In April the official figure for the state's unemployment rate dropped for the second month running.
See also: corner, turn

turn the corner

pass the critical point and start to improve.
See also: corner, turn

turn the ˈcorner

pass the most dangerous point of an illness or the most difficult part of something, and begin to improve: The doctors say she’s turned the corner now. She should be out of hospital soon.Now that we’re beginning to pay back the money we owe, I feel we’ve turned the corner.
See also: corner, turn

turn the corner, to

To begin to recover. Corner here refers to a street corner, and turning it betokens going in a new and presumably better direction. However, this expression was used in several different senses in the past. “That expression . . . He has turn’d the corner, i.e., gone away so as no more to be seen,” wrote Samuel Pegge (Anonymiana, 1796), defining the term to be synonymous with dying. Both Dickens and Trollope used it in the sense of financial recovery. “Now he had turned the corner, he could afford [it],” wrote Trollope in Orley Farm (1862).
See also: turn
References in periodicals archive ?
Foreign Affairs Minister Micheal Martin claimed the tough decisions will help Ireland "turn the corner" and get out of this recession.
Former Hammers boss Redknapp has overseen eight wins in 11 since taking charge of Spurs but Zola's men are unbeaten in three matches and the Italian believes another win will see them turn the corner.
11, 2001, SARS, a high Canadian dollar and high fuel costs, have had a negative impact on the Tourism industry that has just recently started to turn the corner. Recent announcements for investments in this area show that all levels of government are taking this important part of our economy seriously and continuous support of worthwhile projects will further strengthen our region.
He rejoins an injury hit Marine side desperate to turn the corner after losing six of their last seven games and slipping to 17 thin the table.
The beautifully drawn sections tell us something of what is going on, but not how the materials join along their length or how they turn the corner. As in most architectural publications, the love of minimalist graphics gets in the way of communication.
Former Sky Blues chairman Ted Stocker is confident his new company will turn the corner into profitability in the next few months.