turn of the tide


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turn of the tide

A dramatic change or reversal of something, especially a given side's advantage in a competition or conflict. The victory marked a turn of the tide in the war, as allied troops began reclaiming more and more territories overtaken by enemy forces. They were hopeful the success of their latest piece of hardware would prove to be a turn of the tide in their position in the market.
See also: of, tide, turn

turn of the tide

A reversal of fortune, as in This last poll marked the turn of the tide, with our candidate gaining a sizable majority. Similarly, to turn the tide means "reverse a situation," as in The arrival of reinforcements turned the tide in the battle. This idiom transfers the ebb and flow of the ocean's tides to human affairs. Although the idea is much older, the precise idiom dates from the first half of the 1800s.
See also: of, tide, turn

turn of the tide

A reversal of fortune. The changing ebb and flow of the ocean’s tides have been transferred to human affairs for many centuries. Shakespeare pointed out the parallel and used it metaphorically in Julius Caesar, in one of his most often-quoted passages: “There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune” (4.3). In the nineteenth century the current cliché became common. Edward Bulwer-Lytton used it in The Last of the Barons (1843): “This speech turned the tide.”
See also: of, tide, turn
References in periodicals archive ?
Margaret Skea's fascination with 16th Century history led to her debut novel, Turn of the Tide, which won the Historical Fiction prize in the 2011 HarperCollins/Alan Titchmarsh People's Novelist Competition.
Those who have never experienced it will be surprised at the speed of a rising tide and an important point to remember is that the fastest tide flow occurs three to four hours after the turn of the tide - usually about the time that the wildfowler comes into contact with it.
Having failed to secure distribution for a religious film called The Turn of the Tide, he began his own production, distribution and exhibition of films in 1933.
The consolidation and the emergence of the new Green Federation in the coming months may well mean a very positive turn of the tide.
Among his novels are Gallions Reach (1927), All Our Yesterdays (1930), and Morning Light (1946), but he is perhaps better known for his travel books: London River (1921), The Turn of the Tide (1945), and Malay Waters (1950).
Sources: Bryant, Sir Arthur, The Turn of the Tide, 1939-43.
The weather was fine with a light wind that eased at the turn of the tide.
The dolphins were just waiting for the turn of the tide before moving in to snap up the salmon.
But hopefully the National Assembly's decision to provide up to pounds 3m to preserve the ship recently unearthed in Newport signals the turn of the tide.
Timing is also synchronised with the phases of the moon and the turn of the tides.