turn (one's) head

(redirected from turn her head)

turn (one's) head

1. To avoid paying attention to something uncomfortable, undesirable, unsafe, or inconvenient. We all knew that what the board of directors was doing was wrong, but we all just turned our heads because we were still profiting from it. Everyone turned their heads when we raised concerns years ago, and look at what happened as a result!
2. To cause someone to suddenly become fixated or infatuated. She spent all summer exercising and changing her eating habits, and she turned everyone's heads when she came back to school that fall.
3. To cause someone to become arrogant, conceited, or self-important. He's a pretty mediocre writer, but getting published in that literary journal seems to have turned his head.
See also: head, turn

turn someone's head

Fig. [for flattery or success] to distract someone; to cause someone not to be sensible. Don't let our praise turn your head. You're not perfect! Her successes had turned her head. She was now quite arrogant.
See also: head, turn

turn one's head

1. Cause to become infatuated, as in The new teacher turned all the girls' heads. [Mid-1800s]
2. Cause to become conceited, as in Winning that prize has turned his head. A 16th-century translator of Seneca used this phrase: "His head was turned by too great success" ( Ad Lucullus, 1571).
See also: head, turn

turn someone's head

make someone conceited.
See also: head, turn

turn somebody’s ˈhead

(of success, praise, etc.) make a person feel too proud in a way that other people find annoying: You’d better stop giving me all these compliments, or you’ll turn my head!
See also: head, turn
References in classic literature ?
Still, she does not turn her head until she has landed on the other side.
Tess's pride would not allow her to turn her head again, to learn what her father's meaning was, if he had any; and thus she moved on with the whole body to the enclosure where there was to be dancing on the green.
She doesn't slow down or even turn her head to check for traffic when crossing the road.
As she performed, Bennett would expand her chest, angle her shoulders, and turn her head proudly in profile, defining the character's strength through emotional restraint.
Later, it was the loss of peripheral vision -- having to turn her head to see things once visible out of the corner of her eye -- that led her to an optometrist.
"J" didn't feel scared, but a bit stunned, and she decided to turn her head away and recite the Lord's Prayer, thinking, maybe she'd go away.