turn


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turn (away) (from someone or something)

to turn oneself to avoid someone or something. She turned away from me as I walked past, pretending not to see me. She turned from Ken and ran.

turn

1. in. to go over to the other side, as with a spy or a criminal turning into an informer. (Underworld.) Is there a chance that Bart would turn?
2. tv. to corrupt someone; to turn someone to a life of crime. Pete was trying to turn a young kid.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From Canal Street there is a no left turn into John Lewis car park (Hayes Bridge Road).
Row 2 (WS): P5, p2tog (1 st from the rectangle and 1 st from tier 1 rectangle), turn.
7%) U- turns three people each were interviewed and for the remaining 22(18.
With the 80/260 turn--sometimes a 90/270 turn is substituted--cross the fix and intercept the reciprocal of the inbound track.
2 : to change course or direction <The road turns to the left.
Cross the stile and go on with the hedge on your right and turn left at the corner to join the road next to the farm.
After several blocks, turn left onto Dillon Street.
Turn left and then right up the driveway to the Mill House.
Turn your entire body to face toward your right foot.
During the turn, the flight lead went IMC, so increased his angle of bank and transmitted his intentions of rolling out on a heading of 060 degrees.
It turns out attaching and installing an AirPort card was that easy.
The comments on social structure, once a sociohistorical staple, gain urgency in addressing the cultural turn and its aftermath.
33) The turn allows Petrarch to tell something that would otherwise be unknown.
A partner can manually help the athlete turn the hips properly.