tumbling


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tumble across (something)

1. Literally, to trip on something with one's foot. I wasn't watching where I was going and tumbled across the root of a tree. The child tumbled across the steps of the house.
2. To find, discover, or happen upon something casually or by chance. I tumbled across this fantastic little café the other day. Let me know if you tumble across my keys—I haven't been able to find them.
See also: across, tumble

tumble along

1. To roll, fall, or move forward end over end. Scientists estimate the asteroid has been tumbling along through space for hundreds of millions of years. We let go of the giant tractor wheels and watched them tumble along down the hill.
2. To move forward quickly, excitedly, or awkwardly. The kids stopped for a few minutes to look at the lions, then tumbled along to the next animal enclosure.
3. To move along the course (of some path) quickly, excitedly, or awkwardly. We tumbled along the path to the beach, giggling giddily as we went.
See also: tumble

tumble down

1. To collapse or come falling downward. He tripped on the wire running across the hallway and went tumbling down the stairs. The tower came tumbling down after the demolition crews set off the explosive charges.
2. To fall from a high rank or a position of power. That surprise loss sees the former champion tumble down from 1st to 6th place in the tournament leaderboards. The scandal brought the prime minister tumbling down from power. Stock prices have continued tumbling down as the president refuses to rule out a trade war with other nations.
See also: down, tumble

tumble from (something)

1. To fall end over end from some high location. Tom lost his footing and tumbled from the roof. My mother's favorite picture frame tumbled from the mantlepiece and shattered on the ground.
2. To suffer a decline from a high position of power, status, or fortune. That surprise loss sees the former champion tumble from 1st to 6th place in the tournament leaderboards. The scandal brought the prime minister tumbling from power. The company's stock tumbled from 200 to 175 dollars per share this afternoon following the CEO's resignation.
See also: tumble

tumble into (someone or something)

1. To stumble and collide with someone or something. We were all having fun rolling down the hill, but then Billy tumbled right into a tree and hurt his arm. The child tripped and tumbled into her father.
2. To collide with someone or something as a result of moving too quickly or, excitedly, or awkwardly. I hurried out of the elevator with all my things in my arms, and I ended up tumbling into my new boss. Talk about embarrassing! She turned the corner too quickly and tumbled into a lamppost.
3. To move into something or some place quickly, excitedly, or awkwardly. I was so tired that I just went upstairs and tumbled right into bed. Scores of shoppers came tumbling into the store to avail themselves of the incredible sale.
See also: tumble

tumble on (something)

1. Literally, to trip on something with one's foot. I wasn't watching where I was going and tumbled on the root of a tree. The child tumbled on the steps of the house.
2. To find, discover, or happen upon something casually or by chance. I tumbled on this fantastic little café the other day. Let me know if you tumble on my keys—I haven't been able to find them.
See also: on, tumble

tumble out (of something or some place)

1. To spill, fall, or plunge headlong out (of something). He had been hiding in the closet as a part of the game, and he came tumbling out when Meredith opened the door. So much stuff came tumbling out of the closet just now that I don't know how I'll ever get it all tidied away again.
2. To exit or move out (of something or some place) quickly, excitedly, or awkwardly. The moment the final school bell of the year rang, all the students came tumbling out at once. The two teenagers tumbled out of the convenience store, their stolen goods tucked inside their jackets.
See also: out, something, tumble

tumble over

1. To roll, pitch, or fall in some direction from an upright position. This sign keeps tumbling over in the wind. We'll need to secure it to the ground somehow. John tumbled over after the man knocked into him.
2. To fall down after tripping on someone or something. I kept tumbling over partygoers who had fallen asleep on the living room floor. The waiter tumbled over the suitcase the woman had left beside the table.
3. To go across (the edge or side of) something and plunge or plummet down. Tom lost his footing and tumbled over the edge of the roof. I was scared to death that one of the kids would tumble over the cliff. There wasn't even a guardrail in place!
See also: over, tumble

tumble to (something)

1. To fall or topple to some lower location or level. I feared the worst when I saw my grandfather tumble to the floor. He kicked the crate and watched it tumble to the basement.
2. obsolescent To arrive at some conclusion or understanding. I have since tumbled to the belief that animals prove far better companions than other people. It was only after the debt collectors began taking away our belongings that I tumbled to the reality of David's financial woes.
See also: tumble

tumble upon (something)

1. Literally, to trip on something with one's foot. I wasn't watching where I was going and tumbled upon the root of a tree. The child tumbled upon the steps of the house.
2. To find, discover, or happen upon something casually or by chance. I tumbled upon this fantastic little café the other day. Let me know if you tumble upon my keys—I haven't been able to find them.
See also: tumble, upon
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

tumble along

to roll or bounce along. The ball tumbled along, across the lawn and into the street. As the boulder tumbled along, it crushed everything in its path.
See also: tumble

tumble down

to fall down; to topple. The old barn was so rickety that it almost tumbled down on its own. The pile of books tumbled down all over the floor.
See also: down, tumble

tumble over

to fall over. The vase tumbled over and broke. I held Timmy up to keep him from tumbling over.
See also: over, tumble

tumble over someone or something

to trip or stumble over someone or something and fall down. I tumbled over Fred, who was napping under the tree. I tumbled over a chair and fell down.
See also: over, tumble

tumble over (something)

to fall over the edge of something. Stay away from the edge. I don't want any of you tumbling over it. Don't go too close. You'll tumble over.
See also: over, tumble

tumble someone or something down something

to tip or push someone or something down something. Timmy tumbled his brother down the hill. Ann tumbled her laundry down the chute.
See also: down, tumble
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

tumble down

v.
1. To topple, as from power or a high position; fall: That horse started out the race in the lead, but tumbled down to fifth place.
2. To collapse: The wall tumbled down when I leaned on it.
See also: down, tumble
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sam now holds two British tumbling titles, as he was crowned British Champion at National Development Plan level 4 age 13+ in 2018.
Earlier this year Wharton was named Outstanding Coach of the year by British Gymnastics and at the end of 2018 the club's Shanice Davidson won a silver medal in the Senior Women's Tumbling World Championships.
In February, Kallum competed as a senior for the first time at the Tumbling World Cup where he once again soared to new heights with Chris representing GB as his coach in Azerbaijan.
He likes all sport, but he is dedicated to tumbling and hoping to achieve more success.
The chemical composition of chop samples at the end of every tumbling experiment was determined.
I swerved to miss it assuming it was a piece of tyre, but in my rearview mirror I saw the tumbling item (a kitten) get to its feet and run between cars onto the side of the road.
Teams used algorithms in exercises during which the spheres simulated an active spacecraft approaching an object tumbling through space.
Five of the club's gymnasts competed at the Amateur Gymnastics Association National Tumbling Championships at Fenton Manor in Stoke on Trent - and came away with a medal.
BRIT model AGYNESS DEYN managed to see the funny side of tumbling not once, but twice in skyscraper Burberry platforms, at NAOMI CAMPBELL'S Fashion For Relief Haiti Benefit in New York this week.
Active, physical pretend play involving such activities as running, chasing, climbing, playfully wrestling, grabbing, kicking, and tumbling constitutes almost one fourth of children's behavior (McGrew, 1972; Smith & Connolly, 1980).
At the same time, a precision throwing wheel, turning at high speeds (up to 8,000 rpm), throws plastic shot at the tumbling parts, and the plastic shot breaks off the brittle flash on impact.
TOM TAAFFE has pencilled in Tumbling Dice for a crack at the Paddy Power Gold Cup at Cheltenham on Saturday week.
With Lava--her Brooklyn, N.Y.-based all-female troupe of brawny performers--Johnson combines tumbling, trapeze work, modern dance, circus hoops, wrestling, and videos for an exhilarating show.
Kathryn Lasky's Tumble Bunnies (0763622656, 15.99) requires good reading skills or parental assistance as it tells of one Clyde, who worries about being chosen for a team at a major event--until he discovers that tumbling doesn't involve teams.