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nip and tuck

1. noun A cosmetic surgery procedure, often (but not always) one performed on the face. Many women consider getting a nip and tuck as they age, but I think my wrinkles make me look distinguished.
2. noun A minor change to improve something, often the appearance of something. The house just needs a little nip and tuck before it is ready to go up for sale.
3. adjective Of a contest or competition, having a very close margin between the competitors. This race has been nip and tuck, and we won't know who has won until the final vote is counted.
4. adverb Very closely competing; head-to-head. The two teams went nip and tuck down to the final seconds of the game.
See also: and, nip, tuck

be nip and tuck

slang To have a very close margin between the competitors in a contest or competition. This race has been nip and tuck, and we won't know who has won until the final vote is counted.
See also: and, nip, tuck

tucked away

Hidden, either intentionally or incidentally by elements in the surrounding area. The cabin is tucked away in a grove of trees, so you won't even be able to see it from the road. Don't worry about the gems—they've been safely tucked away.
See also: away, tuck

tuck in

1. To fold or gather something, typically a fabric, and push it under or into something else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "tuck" and "in." Would you tuck the sheets in, please? You should tuck in your shirt, or you'll look like a slob for your interview.
2. To place something inside of something else, typically something small, in order to secure it. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "tuck" and "in." She tucked the money in an envelope and slipped it under the door. I tucked your glasses in the side pocket of your jacket.
3. To contract or pull in something, such as a body part. A noun or pronoun can be used between "tuck" and "in." Be sure to tuck in your arms and legs after you jump off the diving board. You'll have to tuck your arms in to squeeze through.
4. To place someone, typically a child, in bed and ready them for sleep, often by actually tucking the bedsheets around them. A noun or pronoun can be used between "tuck" and "in." Do you want me or Mommy to tuck you in tonight? I Just tucked in the kids, so we have the rest of the night to ourselves.
5. To begin eating. Often used as an imperative. OK, tuck in before the food gets cold! The hungry child tucked in as soon as the food was in front of him.
See also: tuck

nip and tuck

Fig. almost even; almost tied. The horses ran nip and tuck for the first half of the race. Then my horse pulled ahead. In the football game last Saturday, both teams were nip and tuck throughout the game.
See also: and, nip, tuck

tuck into something

to begin eating something vigorously. The kids really tucked into the stew. I could see from the way that they tucked into their meal that they were really hungry.
See also: tuck

tuck someone in(to) something

 and tuck someone in
to place someone into something carefully; to wrap someone in blankets or something similar. Father tucked Jimmy into bed an hour later than he should have. Please tuck in Jimmy.
See also: tuck

tuck something around someone or something

to wrap something snugly around someone or something. I tucked crumpled newspapers around the cups in the box to keep them from breaking. Molly-Jo tucked the covers around the baby.
See also: around, tuck

tuck something away

 
1. Lit. to hide or store something away. Tuck this away where you can find it later. Can you tuck away this money somewhere?
2. Fig. to eat something. The boys tucked away three pizzas and an apple pie. When I was younger, I could tuck away my dinner in no time at all.
See also: away, tuck

tuck something in (to) something

 and tuck something in
to fold or stuff something into something. Please tuck your shirttail into your pants. Tuck in your shirt tail. When you make the bed, you have to tuck the sheets in.
See also: tuck

tuck something up

to raise up some part of one's clothing and attach it temporarily. She tucked her skirt up and waded through the flooded basement. She tucked up her skirt.
See also: tuck, up

tuck something up (under something)

to place or push something, such as cloth, up under something. Tuck the sheet up under the mattress when you make the bed. Tuck up the sheet under the mattress when you make the bed.
See also: tuck, up

nip and tuck

Very close so that the advantage or lead of competitors keeps shifting, as in It was nip and tuck whether they would deal with the bill before Congress adjourned. The precise allusion in this term has been lost. [Early 1800s] Also see neck and neck.
See also: and, nip, tuck

tuck away

1. Eat heartily, as in He tucked away an enormous steak. [Colloquial; mid-1800s] Also see tuck into.
2. Hide, put in storage, as in She had several hundred dollars tucked away. [c. 1900]
See also: away, tuck

tuck in

Thrust in the edge of or end of something, such as bed linens or a shirt; also, make a child secure in bed by folding in the bedclothes. For example, Tuck in your shirt; it looks awful hanging out of your pants, or Mother went upstairs to tuck in the children. [First half of 1600s]
See also: tuck

tuck into

Eat heartily or greedily, as in For a two-year-old he really tucked into his food. [Early 1800s]
See also: tuck

nip and tuck

INFORMAL
In a competition or contest, if it is nip and tuck, it is impossible to say who will win because both sides are performing equally well. It was nip and tuck throughout as the players struck the ball with equal passion. It was nip-and-tuck from start to finish. Note: One explanation for this expression is that it comes from sword-fighting, where a `nip' is a light touch and a `tuck' a heavier blow. Another is that it comes from horse racing, where it means the same as `neck and neck'.
See also: and, nip, tuck

nip and tuck

very closely contested; neck and neck.
The phrase, which emerged in the US in the 19th century, probably came from the field of sewing or tailoring.
2002 Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society The rough and tumble Senate race is generally regarded as nip and tuck, likely to be decided by a close margin
See also: and, nip, tuck

tuck away

v.
1. To put something in an out-of-the-way, snug place: She tucked away her wallet under all of the socks. He tucked the files away in the back of the filing cabinet. The cabin is tucked away in the mountains.
2. To store something in a safe spot; save something: The child tucked away some candy. I'll bet my neighbors have tucked millions of dollars away.
3. Slang To consume some food heartily: The hungry farmer tucked away three steaks. The food left over from lunch was gone by dinnertime, since I tucked it all away during the afternoon.
See also: away, tuck

tuck in

v.
1. To gather something up and fold, thrust, or turn in so as to secure or confine it: The teacher told the boys to tuck in their shirts. I threw the sheet over the bed and tucked it in at the corners.
2. To make someone secure in bed for sleep, especially by tucking bedclothes into the bed: I tucked in my daughter and said good night. The babysitter tucked the little boy in.
3. To draw in some body part; contract something: She tucked in her arms and shook her head. The turtle tucked in its head.
4. Slang To begin to eat heartily: Dinner was served, and we tucked in.
See also: tuck

tuck into

v.
1. To gather something up and fold or thrust it into something so as to secure or confine it: I wrote the number on a piece of paper and tucked it into my pocket.
2. To make someone secure in some bed for sleep, especially by tucking bedclothes into the bed: After the children put on their pajamas, I tucked them into bed.
3. Slang To begin to eat something heartily: We tucked into a stack of pancakes.
See also: tuck

tuck up

v.
1. To put someone or something in a snug spot: The babysitter tucked the children up soundly in bed. I tucked up the horses in the barn.
2. To put something in an out-of-the-way, snug place: The cabin was tucked up among the pines. I tucked my hair up under a wool cap.
3. To draw up some body part into a tuck position: The diver tucked up her legs for a somersault. The gymnast tucked his knees up to his chest during the dismount.
4. To assume a tuck position: The flight attendants advised the passengers to tuck up for a rough landing.
See also: tuck, up

nip and tuck

mod. so close as to be almost the same; neck and neck. They ran nip and tuck all the way to the finish line, but Tom won the race.
See also: and, nip, tuck
References in periodicals archive ?
Tucks products are said to provide soothing relief from hemorrhoidal and other types of rectal irritation.
Baby A had a velamentous cord insertion, and baby B had a succenturiate lobe and a TUCK.
NEARLY 200 Merseysiders have had tummy tuck operations on the NHS in the last three years.
Across the country more than 3,000 tummy tucks took place on the NHS in the last three years.
According to the Birmingham-based Cosmetic Surgery Guide, an average tummy tuck would set a private patient back around PS4,000.
The 43 per cent of over-35s coming for tummy tucks, or abdominoplasties, is in the first two months of 2010 at its Belfast clinic compared with the same time last year, with figures still rising, Liz said.
Coun Ian Tuck, of Heol-Y-Glyn, Treharris, and his father Graham of Y Goedwig, Edwardsville, Treharris, have been summoned to appear before magistrates on Monday.
Though events force the Tucks to flee Tree-gap, splitting Winnie from Jesse, windup back in present ends the tale on a tender, contemplative and bittersweet note.
Tummy tuck or breast reduction--more gay men and lesbians are turning to the knife
Once reserved for Hollywood's elite and America's wealthy, the tummy tuck, also known as an abdominoplasty, is a cosmetic surgical procedure to which people of all walks of life are turning to for tightening the abdomen and the removal of excessive skin and fat.
See, the Tucks have a secret, although you wouldn't know it since director Jay Russell (``My Dog Skip'') gives the whole thing away in the movie's first two minutes.
The Tuck Label Applicator prints, folds (tucks) customer-sensitive data into a private, sealed area and applies the document to goods or cartons.
After she discovers the family's fountain of youth, the Tucks kidnap Winnie to keep their secret safe.