tucker

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Related to tuckered: tuckered out
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(one's) best bib and tucker

One's dressiest or most formal attire. A "bib" and a "tucker" are outdated clothing embellishments. Be sure to wear your best bib and tucker to the gala tonight.
See also: and, bib, tucker

all tuckered out

Completely fatigued or sleepy, especially after long or continuous physical activity. After a day at the amusement park, the kids were all tuckered out and fell asleep in the car on the way home. I'm pretty tuckered out after that hike, to be honest.
See also: all, out, tucker

tucker out

1. To become sleepy or fatigued, especially after long, continuous physical activity. Hopefully the kids will tucker out if we let them run around outside for long enough. I started tuckering out only halfway through the hike.
2. To cause someone or an animal to become sleepy or fatigued, especially after long or continuous physical activity. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "tucker" and "out." I thought swimming at the beach all day would have tuckered him out, but he still seems to have loads of energy. Climbing up all those steps really tuckered out my poor old dog.
See also: out, tucker

tuckered out

Fatigued or sleepy, especially after long or continuous physical activity. I thought the kids would have been tuckered out after spending all day at the pool, but they're still full of energy. I'm pretty tuckered out after that hike, to be honest.
See also: out, tucker
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*(all) tuckered out

Rur. tired out; worn out. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) Poor John worked so hard that he's all tuckered out. Look at that little baby sleeping. She's really tuckered out.
See also: out, tucker

one's best bib and tucker

Rur. one's best clothing. I always put on my best bib and tucker on Sundays. Put on your best bib and tucker, and let's go to the city.
See also: and, bib, tucker

tucker someone out

to tire someone out. All this work has tuckered me out. The heavy work tuckered the staff out early in the day.
See also: out, tucker
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

best bib and tucker

One's finest clothes, dressed up, as in The men were told to put on their best bib and tucker for the dinner dance. Although wearing either a bib (frill at front of a man's shirt) or a tucker (ornamental lace covering a woman's neck and shoulders) is obsolete, the phrase survives. [Mid-1700s] For a synonym, see Sunday best.
See also: and, bib, tucker

tuckered out

Exhausted, very tired, as in I was all tuckered out after that game. The precise origin of this usage is not known. [Colloquial; 1820s]
See also: out, tucker
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

your best bib and tucker

OLD-FASHIONED
If you are wearing your best bib and tucker, you are wearing very smart, formal clothes. The conference guests all turned up on time in their best bib and tucker. Note: In the past, a `bib' was the part of an apron which covered the chest. A `tucker' was a decorative part of a woman's dress, covering her neck and shoulders.
See also: and, bib, tucker
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

your best bib and tucker

your best clothes. informal
Bib and tucker originally referred to certain items of women's clothing. A bib is a garment worn over the upper front part of the body (e.g. the bib of an apron), and a tucker was a decorative piece of lace formerly worn on a woman's bodice.
See also: and, bib, tucker
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

your best bib and ˈtucker

(humorous) your best clothes that you only wear on special occasions: Bill put on his best bib and tucker and booked a table at a top restaurant for a romantic dinner.
Bib and tucker are both items of clothing worn in the past.
See also: and, bib, tucker
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

tucker out

v.
To make someone weary; exhaust someone: Hiking all day tuckered me out. The long bus ride tuckered out the travelers.
See also: out, tucker
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

best bib and tucker, one's

Dressed in one’s finest clothes. A tucker was an ornamental piece of lace worn by women in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to cover the neck and shoulders. A bib was either a fancy frill worn at the front of a man’s shirt or an actual formal shirt front. Their pairing with best dates from the mid-eighteenth century. The word bib appeared in print in America in 1795: “The old gentleman put on his best bib and band [i.e., collar]” (The Art of Courting, Newburyport, Massachusetts). A later locution, dating from the mid-nineteenth century, is one’s Sunday best, also known as Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes. It refers to an era when one’s finery was reserved for church (or “prayer meeting”). These Americanisms sound archaic today. See also gussied up.
See also: and, bib
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

all tuckered out

Exhausted. “Tucker” was a 19th-century New England word for “tire” or “used up.”
See also: all, out, tucker
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
See also: