trust

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Related to trusts: Sherman Antitrust Act, Irrevocable trust, Revocable Trusts, Living Trusts, Business Trusts

in trust

Especially of money or property, in the protection, care, or guardianship of a trustee. Following her parents' sudden deaths, the young heiress's fortune was held in trust by her paternal grandfather.
See also: trust

brain trust

A group of experts who are chosen to be advisors to a person in power and aid in making important decisions. All politicians need a brain trust to help guide them through the campaign process and stay informed of the important issues facing their constituency.
See also: brain, trust

I wouldn't trust (someone) as far as I could throw (them)

I do not trust that person at all. You want me to tell our plans to Jill? I wouldn't trust Jill as far as I could throw her.
See also: could, far, throw, trust

not trust (one) an inch

To not trust one at all. I've known Vick since we were kids, and I don't trust him an inch—he's always up to something.
See also: inch, not, trust

*in the trust of someone

under the responsibility or in the care of someone. (*Typically: be ~; leave someone or something ~; place someone or something ~.) The state placed the orphan in the trust of the foster parents. Our bonds are left in the trust of our broker.
See also: of, trust

misplace one's trust (in someone)

to put trust in the wrong person; to put trust in someone who does not deserve it. The writer misplaced his trust in his editor. The voters misplaced their trust in the corrupt politician.
See also: trust

place one's trust in someone or something

to trust someone or something. If you place your trust in me, everything will work out all right. You should place your trust in your own proven talent.
See also: place, trust

put one's trust in someone or something

to trust someone or something. Will I never be able to put my trust in you? You can put your trust in the bank. Its deposits are insured.
See also: put, trust

Put your trust in God, and keep your powder dry.

 and Keep your powder dry.
Prov. Have faith that God will make sure that you win a conflict, but be prepared to fight well and vigorously. (Supposed to have been said by Oliver Cromwell; powder means gunpowder.) Bill: Am I going to win my lawsuit? Alan: All you can do is put your trust in God, and keep your powder dry.
See also: and, dry, keep, powder, put, trust

restore someone's trust in something

 and restore someone's belief in something; restore someone's faith in something
to reinstate someone's belief, faith, trust, etc., in something. I knew that a good performance on the test would restore my parents' belief in me. Her faith was restored in the government.
See also: restore, trust

take something on trust

to accept that something is true through trust. I don't know if it's so, but I'll take it on trust. CH You will have to take it on trust because I can't prove it.
See also: on, take, trust

trust in someone or something

to believe in someone or something. Trust in me. I know what I am saying. Can I trust in the figures in this report?
See also: trust

Trust me!

I am telling you the truth. Please believe me. Tom said with great conviction, "Trust me! I know exactly what to do!" Mary: Do you really think we can keep this party a secret until Thursday? Sally: Trust me! I know how to plan a surprise party.
See also: trust

trust someone for something

to depend on someone for payment for something. I will lend you one hundred dollars. I know I can trust you for it. I loaned Ted a lot of money. It's all right. I can trust him for it.
See also: trust

trust someone or something to someone

to leave someone or something in the possession of someone whom you assume will take good care of someone or something. Can I trust my little Jimmy to you? I am perfectly comfortable trusting this money to you.
See also: trust

trust someone to do something

to believe that someone can be relied on to do something. You can trust her to be here on time. I can't trust myself to eat wisely.
See also: trust

trust someone with someone or something

to leave someone in the care of someone or something. Can I trust you with my uncle? He needs to have his medicine right on time. I am sure I can trust you with the money. Don't leave that cake with me. I can't trust myself with it.
See also: trust

brain trust

A group of experts who serve as unofficial but vital advisers. For example, Each town manager seemed to have his or her own brain trust, which of course changed with every election . This term, closely associated with President Franklin Roosevelt's advisers on domestic and foreign policy in the early 1930s, was first recorded in 1910.
See also: brain, trust

in trust

In the possession or care of a trustee, as in The money was held in trust for the children's education. This expression implies having confidence in someone (the trustee). [Mid-1500s]
See also: trust

not trust someone as far as you could throw them

If you say that you would not trust someone as far as you could throw them, you mean that you do not trust them at all. He may look innocent, but I wouldn't trust him as far as I could throw him. Note: People sometimes use can instead of could. The government says that it is green, but I wouldn't trust them as far as I can throw them.
See also: could, far, not, throw, trust

not trust someone as far as you can throw them

not trust or hardly trust a particular person at all. informal
See also: can, far, not, throw, trust

ˌtried and ˈtested/ˈtrusted

(British English) (American English ˌtried and ˈtrue) that you have used or relied on in the past successfully: We’ll be using a tried and tested technique to solve the problem.
See also: and, test, tried, trust

in somebody’s ˈtrust

,

in the trust of somebody

being looked after by somebody: The family pet was left in the trust of a neighbour.
See also: trust

not trust somebody an ˈinch

not trust somebody at all: He says he just wants to help you but I wouldn’t trust him an inch if I were you.
See also: inch, not, somebody, trust

take something on ˈtrust

believe what somebody says even though you do not have any proof or evidence to show that it is true: I took it on trust that the painting was genuine. I had no reason to believe he would try to deceive me.
See also: on, something, take, trust

trust ˈyou, ˈhim, ˈher, etc. (to do something)

(spoken, informal) used when somebody does or says something that you think is typical of them: Trust you to forget my birthday!Trust it to rain at the weekend!
See also: trust

trust in

v.
To depend on someone or something: The preacher told the congregation to trust in God.
See also: trust

trust to

v.
To depend on something: I'd rather plan my financial future than trust to luck.
See also: trust

trust with

v.
To grant discretion to someone confidently: Can you trust them with your credit card information?
See also: trust

Trust me!

exclam. Believe me!; Honestly! He actually said it just like Tom told you. Trust me!
See also: trust
References in classic literature ?
And while you maunder about restoring competition, the trusts go on destroying you.
When he says "free opportunity for all," he means free opportunity to squeeze profits, which freedom of opportunity is now denied him by the great trusts.
Let Minnie trust him, Clennam said, let Minnie trust him to do all she wished.
For the absurdity must continually stare us in the face of confiding to a government the direction of the most essential national interests, without daring to trust it to the authorities which are indispensible to their proper and efficient management.
I trust, however, that the impracticability of one general system cannot be shown.
When, therefore, servants, and princes towards servants, are thus disposed, they can trust each other, but when it is otherwise, the end will always be disastrous for either one or the other.
A very few years more and the hazardous difficulties of handling a fleet under canvas shall have passed beyond the conception of seamen who hold in trust for their country Lord Nelson's legacy of heroic spirit.
He would never trouble me again, and he begged only that I would hand over to him the sum which I held in trust for him.
AN Undertaker Who Was a Member of a Trust saw a Man Leaning on a Spade, and asked him why he was not at work.
My friend," said the Undertaker Who Was a Member of a Trust, "this is a most hateful and injurious scheme.
At last she spoke in a hard and measured voice, as one who dare not trust herself to speak too freely.
I have in this edition largely condensed and corrected some parts, and have added a little to others, in order to render the volume more fitted for popular reading; but I trust that naturalists will remember, that they must refer for details to the larger publications which comprise the scientific results of the Expedition.
He knew that he could trust my experience and my industry.
And now I found myself in great distress; what little I had in the world was all in money, except as before, a little plate, some linen, and my clothes; as for my household stuff, I had little or none, for I had lived always in lodgings; but I had not one friend in the world with whom to trust that little I had, or to direct me how to dispose of it, and this perplexed me night and day.
I will rely upon it, if you will tell me I may so far trust - '