trudge


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trudge along

1. To walk onward with heavy, laborious steps. We trudged along through the thick mud, weighed down as much by hunger and fatigue as by our packs. Are we almost there yet? We've been trudging along for over an hour!
2. To walk over the length of something with heavy, laborious steps. I trudged along the sidewalk that led to my office building, dreading the confrontation I would have with the boss. The kids trudged along the trail behind their parents in sullen silence.
3. To make progress at a slow, arduous pace. The work was horribly tedious, but I just put on my headphones and kept trudging along. I know the last few weeks have been hard for the whole team, but we've got to trudge along to the end.
See also: trudge

trudge through

1. To walk through some environment, substance, weather, etc., with heavy, laborious steps. We trudged through the thick mud, weighed down as much by hunger and fatigue as by our packs. I hate having to trudge through this awful wind each day on the way to work. We trudged through the mountains for hours in search of our lost comrade.
2. To progress through (some task or activity) at a slow, arduous pace. The data-entry work was horribly tedious, but I just put on my headphones and kept trudging through the spreadsheet. I know the last few weeks have been hard for the whole team, but we've got to trudge through to the end.
See also: through, trudge
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

trudge along

to plod along on foot. It seemed as if we trudged along for miles. As we trudged along, we forgot how cold it was.
See also: trudge

trudge through something

 
1. Lit. to walk through snow, sand, or something similar. We trudged through the hot sand all the way down the beach. I used to have to trudge through snow like this all winter to get to school.
2. Fig. to work one's way through something difficult. I hate to have to trudge through these reports on the weekend. I have to trudge through a lot of work before I can go home.
See also: through, trudge
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the lake's shallow southern shore--home to the most popular resorts--the water retreated from shore by 150 to 300 feet, forcing bathers to trudge through the mud before every swim.
There, barely discernible figures trudge toward a mountain; above, a small brownish slice of sky remains untouched by the ecstatically colorful rays of the sun.
It is first when one starts to trudge, with the author, up muddy paths and down slippery shale slopes, that one begins to sense a certain disjunction between the "two books." The first book does indeed establish a reasonable frame within which to understand the second.
Don't just trudge through the sludge of poorly written finance books that weren't written with you in mind.
The standard, 8-foot-wide, double-loaded corridor-- often unremarkable and Disorienting--leaves residents with no place to congregate near their rooms and no desire to trudge all the way down to a central hub.
Red-and-yellow long-necked birds trudge through knee-deep pools of brown muck.
It has been a hard trudge, with fainting, bandaging and death.
I meekly started to trudge back home, very narrowly escaping serious injury when a diaper service truck whipped past me.
And then, for the next nine minutes, credits trudge up a black screen.
The fountain adds to this majestic view Under a rich sky painted white and blue For bruised clouds have retreated for a while, The deep snows now just a memory, Gorsedd Gardens in the background As shoppers trudge towards busy city streets, Most oblivious to the beauty before their eyes.
On the way home we trudge through The snow which lay thick and even Upon the pavements, a bag of hot greasy Chips wrapped in newspaper for our supper Surprisingly what a spot of 'day-dreaming' Conjures up, certainly does you a power of good!
RODGERS Howard On May 18, Howard (Charlie Trudge) at home after a long illness borne with great courage and dignity.