truck

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Related to trucks: Pickup trucks

fall off a truck

Of goods or merchandise, to be acquired by illegal or dubious means; to come into (someone's) possession without being paid for. Danny says he has several laptops and smartphones he wants to sell for cheap—sounds like they fell off a truck to me.
See also: fall, off, truck

fall off the back of a truck

Of goods or merchandise, to be acquired by illegal or dubious means; to come into (someone's) possession without being paid for. Danny says he has several laptops and smartphones he wants to sell for cheap—sounds like they fell off the back of a truck to me.
See also: back, fall, of, off, truck

fall off the turnip truck

To be gullible, naïve, or unsophisticated. The subject is often a person from a rural or rustic background. Mary has no idea about how to act in polite society, always behaving as if she just fell off the turnip truck.
See also: fall, off, truck, turnip

have truck with

To work well with or associate with someone. The phrase is most commonly used in the negative ("have no truck with") to describe someone or something that will not work together. Let me call that office—I used to work there, so I have truck with them. That lowlife has no truck with us, so tell him not to come around here anymore.
See also: have, truck

off the back of a truck

Likely by illegal or dubious means. (Said of the way something has been gotten.) Primarily heard in US, Australia. A: "Jake's been peddling a bunch of flat screens for a great price." A: "He probably got them off the back of a truck. I wouldn't go for them, if I were you." Danny says he has several laptops and smartphones he wants to sell for cheap—sounds like they fell off the back of a truck to me.
See also: back, of, off, truck

have no truck with (someone or something)

To not be involved with someone or something. Oh, I have no truck with him anymore, not since our fight.
See also: have, truck

have no truck with something

Rur. to have nothing to do with something. After the way Mary treated me, I'll have no truck with her. We only show good, wholesome movies at this theater. We have no truck with most of that Hollywood trash.
See also: have, truck

just fell off the turnip truck

Rur. ignorant; unsophisticated. He stood there gawking at the buildings in town like he just fell off the turnip truck. My cousin acts like she just fell off the turnip truck.
See also: fell, just, off, truck, turnip

keep on trucking

Inf. to continue to do well; to continue to try. Just keep on trucking, man. All I can do is keep on trucking.
See also: keep, on, truck

have no truck with

Have no dealings with, as in The doctor said he wanted no truck with midwives. This term was first recorded in 1868, although truck in the sense of "dealings" dates from the early 1600s.
See also: have, truck

can drive a truck through something

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If you can drive a truck through something such as an agreement, contract or argument, it has serious weaknesses or faults. In my view, Miller's fiscal plan is so thin you could drive a truck through it. Note: You can also say that something has weaknesses big enough to drive a truck through. Clearly, there were loopholes in the system big enough to drive a truck through.

have no truck with something/someone

COMMON If you have no truck with something or someone, you disapprove of them and refuse to become involved with them. As an American, she had no truck with the formality of English life. Great efforts were made to get him on the side of the rebels. He had no truck with them. Note: The verbs want and hold are sometimes used instead of have. Most traditional doctors hold no truck with these ideas. Note: `Truck' is an old term which referred to trading goods by bartering. `To have no truck with someone' literally means to have no dealings with them.
See also: have, something, truck

have (or want) no truck with

1 avoid dealing or being associated with. 2 be unsympathetic or opposed to.
The earliest sense of truck was ‘trading by the exchange of commodities’ (from French troquer , meaning ‘barter’), from which developed the sense ‘communication or dealings’.
See also: have, truck

keep on trucking

used as an encouragement to keep going, not to give up. informal
2004 Something Awful His most prized possession is a Denny 's dinner plate which was signed by Gene Roddenberry reading, ‘Dear Harlan, keep on trucking, some day you'll get the hang of this whole writing thing, sincerely Gene.’
See also: keep, on, truck

have/want no ˈtruck with somebody/something

(British English) not want to deal with or be involved with somebody/something: He’ll have no truck with anyone on the political left.

Keep on trucking

sent. Keep doing what you are doing.; Keep taking care of business. Keep on trucking. Things’ll get better.
See also: keep, on, truck

fall off the cabbage truck

To be a nai¨ve newcomer. Imagine a flatbed farm wagon laden with fresh produce arriving in a city. Sliding off the back was a country bumpkin whose brain, or so smug sophisticated urbanites would agree, contained no more clue about worldly ways than a head of cabbage that might roll off the vehicle. A similar expression was to say that someone “just got off the boat,” a reference to immigration in the days of steamship passage when new arrivals were thoroughly ignorant of New World customs. Among the snappy denials to being called a hick or greenhorn were “I wasn't born yesterday” or “I might have been born at night, but not last night” or the wonderfully imaginative Midwestern comeback, “Hey, what makes you think I just got off the noon balloon from Rangoon?”
See also: cabbage, fall, off, truck

have no truck with

Avoid. “Truck” came from the French woes for “barter.” Originally, if you had no truck with somebody, you refused to trade with him or her. By extension it came to mean you refused to have anything to do with the person.
See also: have, truck
References in classic literature ?
Then the mice were unharnessed from the truck and scampered away through the grass to their homes.
21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ --Research and Markets as announced the addition of the "Global Medium/Heavy-Duty OEM Trucks and Tier 1 Components" report to their offering.
Harvick will also be racing one of his own trucks, the No.
Big trucks have typically meant bigger profits for the automakers, on the order of $2,000 for a pickup vs.
Among the things they learn are that trucks equipped with a high-production shredder will offer fewer advantages if they don't also have considerable storage capacity.
But, based on what has been announced so far, there are two major issues that cause us concern: the associated costs of truck driver registration/security checks and the need for border infrastructure improvements so that pre-cleared trucks can move quickly through dedicated lanes.
When MTMC surface shipments reach destinations in Uzbekistan and Karshi Khanabad by rail, road or aircraft, contracted private trucks managed by Cintron's unit redistributes the supplies to American and allied troops in Afghanistan, completing the supply chain.
The National Cargo Transport Chamber (Canacar), an organization comprising some 180,000 truck owners, says an average of 800 trucks are reported hijacked every year at a loss of US$253 million.
The idea, said Mike Russell, director of public relations for the 4,000-member ATA, was to display antique and brand-new trucks side by side to show the changes in technology that lead to improved safety.
To begin with, let's factor single-unit trucks out of the equation.
com/reports/c50988) has announced the addition of Trucks in France to their offering.
LCVs weigh up to 7 tons, heavy trucks weigh greater than 7 tons, and buses & coaches weigh greater than 7 tons.
Everything changes in NASCAR racing, especially these trucks, so you have to stay on top of it," said Hornaday, a former Saugus Speedway champ from Palmdale.
We focused our study on commercial trucks, especially on the manufacturers of class 7-8 trucks, which are significantly different from OEMs that produce light-and-medium duty trucks due to differences in economies of scale and the end markets served.
What, has complicated matters on the transportation side has been the move by many consuming mills toward a just-in-time inventory process, which typically favors trucks.