trout

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old trout

rude slang A curmudgeonly old lady. Primarily heard in UK. Eh, the things she says don't really bother me—she's just a harmless old trout, so I just ignore her when I pass by her house.
See also: old, trout

trouser snake

vulgar slang A penis. I came in the room and he was standing there with his trouser snake hanging right out in the open.
See also: snake, trouser

trouser trout

vulgar slang A penis. I came in the room and he was standing there with his trouser trout hanging right out in the open.
See also: trouser, trout

you must lose a fly to catch a trout

proverb It is often necessary to make smaller sacrifices in order to make larger or more meaningful acquisitions or advancements. It turns out the tech company actually sells the hardware at a slight loss, making a much larger profit on the various software that customers buy for it. You must lose a fly to catch a trout, as the saying goes. I know that the cost of the accounting course is off-putting, but it will really accelerate your career. You must lose a fly to catch a trout!
See also: catch, fly, lose, must, trout
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

You must lose a fly to catch a trout.

Prov. You have to sacrifice something in order to get what you want. (Implies that what you sacrifice is minor compared to what you will get.) Amy was willing to live cheaply for several years in order to save enough money to buy her own house. She knew that you must lose a fly to catch a trout.
See also: catch, fly, lose, must, trout
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

old trout

an unattractive or bad-tempered old woman. informal
1972 Victor Canning . The Rainbird Pattern She wasn't such a bad old trout. For all her money and position, life hadn't been all good to her.
See also: old, trout
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

trouser snake

and trouser trout
n. the penis. The doctor was taken aback when young Willard used the term “trouser snake.” Stop scratching your trouser trout in public.
See also: snake, trouser

trouser trout

verb
See also: trouser, trout
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

old trout

Chiefly British Offensive Slang
An elderly woman.
See also: old, trout
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
However, since he seems a friend of yours, here goes--" And with the gladdest, most grateful sound in the world, the happy smack of a fish back home again in the water, after an appalling three minutes spent on land, that prophetic trout was once more an active unit in God's populous universe.
"But of course," she said, "you owe it to me, after this touching display of humanitarianism, to entertain me with your reason for interposing between me and my just trout. Was it one of those wonderful talking fishes out of the Arabian Nights, or are you merely an angler yourself, and did you begrudge such a record catch to a girl?"
That trout was, so to speak, out of the Arabian Nights.
Tell me some more about the trout. What was the wonderful message he seemed to give you?
But then I couldn't, with any respect for her, tell her the trout's message, or, with any respect for myself, recall those atrocious doggerel lines.
"But tell me about the trout," she once more persisted.
most prophetic and agreeable trout! Was it not like the old fairy tales, the you-help-us and we'll-help-you of Psyche and the ants?
"I beg your pardon, I hope you will forgive the liberty that we - perfect strangers in the neighbourhood - are taking, but my friend here and myself would be so much obliged if you would tell us how you caught that trout up there."
"Why, who told you I caught that trout!" was the surprised query.
We told him the various histories we had heard about his trout, and he was immensely amused, and we all laughed very heartily.
He said that bringing home that trout had saved him from a whacking, and that even his school-master had said it was worth the rule-of-three and practice put together.
It really was a most astonishing trout. The more we looked at it, the more we marvelled at it.
That trout lay shattered into a thousand fragments - I say a thousand, but they may have only been nine hundred.
But I knew it to be a stick of "giant"; for such was his method of catching trout. He dynamited them.
I "hooked" the apples, leaped the brook, and scared the musquash and the trout. It was one of those afternoons which seem indefinitely long before one, in which many events may happen, a large portion of our natural life, though it was already half spent when I started.