trouble (someone or oneself) about (someone or something)

(redirected from trouble herself about)

trouble (someone or oneself) about (someone or something)

1. To bother or inconvenience someone with a question or request about someone or something. I'm sorry to trouble you about this again, but I need your help with a new problem that has cropped up. You should never worry about troubling your teachers or parents about someone who is bullying you in school.
2. To concern oneself with or worry about someone or something. Often used in negative constructions. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun is always used. It's just a minor technical error that should resolve itself—don't trouble yourself about it. I know I need to stop troubling myself about such negative people, but I can't help letting their comments get to me.
See also: trouble

trouble someone about someone or something

to bother someone by asking about someone or something. Please don't trouble me about Larry. Can I trouble you about a billing problem?
See also: trouble

trouble oneself about someone or something

to worry oneself about someone or something. (Usually in the negative.) Please don't trouble yourself about me. I'm doing fine. I can't take time to trouble myself about this matter. Do it yourself.
See also: trouble
References in classic literature ?
"I always had a suspicion that gentleman had a passion for my daughter," said Ricote; "but as I felt sure of my Ricota's virtue it gave me no uneasiness to know that he loved her; for thou must have heard it said, Sancho, that the Morisco women seldom or never engage in amours with the old Christians; and my daughter, who I fancy thought more of being a Christian than of lovemaking, would not trouble herself about the attentions of this heir."
Perhaps I had better say no more, Gertrude, by turning away to put up her cue, signified that that was a point for him to consider; she not intending to trouble herself about it.
"Nobility; that is, enough to enable her to approach the king without awkwardness - not too lofty, so as not to trouble herself about the dignity of her race."