trouble (someone or oneself) with (someone or something)

trouble (someone or oneself) with (someone or something)

1. To bother or inconvenience someone with something, such as a problem, question, or task. There's no need to trouble the boss with this—the project manager should be able to help you resolve it. Excuse me, could I trouble you with a couple of questions for my school paper?
2. To concern oneself with or worry about someone or something. Often used in negative constructions. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun is always used. It's just a minor technical error that should resolve itself—don't trouble yourself with it. I know I need to stop troubling myself with such negative people, but I can't help letting their comments get to me.
3. To burden or inconvenience oneself with the undertaking of some task. Often used in negative constructions. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun is always used. Don't trouble yourself with cutting the lawn, Jeremy, I can do that another time. He couldn't trouble himself with backing up his files, and now he's lost all of his work.
See also: trouble
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

trouble someone with something

to bother someone with something, such as a question or a problem. I hate to trouble you with this, but could you help me adjust my binoculars? Don't trouble yourself with this matter.
See also: trouble
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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