trouble


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Your father and I had a trouble once, and I thought I could never forgive him; so I kept away for years.
I can't tell why, only she seems so happy and busy, and sings so beautifully, and is strong enough to scrub and sweep, and hasn't any troubles to plague her," said Rose, making a funny jumble of reasons in her efforts to explain.
"My heart is knit to your aged mother since it was granted me to be near her in the day of trouble. Speak to her of me, and tell her I often bear her in my thoughts at evening time, when I am sitting in the dim light as I did with her, and we held one another's hands, and I spoke the words of comfort that were given to me.
I am carried away to them continually in my sleep, and often in the midst of work, and even of speech, the thought of them is borne in on me as if they were in need and trouble, which yet is dark to me.
It was part of Skipper's trouble. Jerry did not reason this conclusion.
He sat up, just out of range of one restless, beating arm, yearned to come closer and lick again the face of the god who knew him not, and who, he knew, loved him well, and palpitatingly shared and suffered all Skipper's trouble.
'I intend to give you some trouble yet,' said I; 'and perhaps, sir, you will find yourself checkmated before you are aware.
The game was a long one, and I did give him some trouble: but he was a better player than I.
Thus urged, he would frequently give himself the trouble of watching them from the windows during their play; at times, he would follow them through the grounds, and too often came suddenly upon them while they were dabbling in the forbidden well, talking to the coachman in the stables, or revelling in the filth of the farm-yard--and I, meanwhile, wearily standing, by, having previously exhausted my energy in vain attempts to get them away.
To avoid trouble and confusion, I have taken my pupils one by one, and discussed their various qualities; but this can give no adequate idea of being worried by the whole three together; when, as was often the case, all were determined to 'be naughty, and to tease Miss Grey, and put her in a passion.'
The idea of trouble immediately connected itself with what had been unaccountable to her in him.
To think of your marrying into this trouble. Debt was bad enough, but this will be worse."
So I told you I was ex- pecting trouble myself, and would scatter out WITH you.
Neither doth it follow, that because these fames are a sign of troubles, that the suppressing of them with too much severity, should be a remedy of troubles.
"Troubles, troubles, my dear fellow!" he said to Pierre.