trot

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bad trot

A moment or period of specific misfortune or bad luck. Primarily heard in Australia. I can feel it! The next horse race will be the end of my bad trot!
See also: bad, trot

be a rough trot

To be an especially difficult period or series of misfortune(s) or hardship(s). Primarily heard in Australia, New Zealand. It's certainly been a rough trot for the beleaguered celebrity family, as news of yet another scandal started hitting the media outlets this afternoon. Jake's chemotherapy was a really rough trot for a while there, but he seems to be handling it much better recently.
See also: rough, trot

have a rough trot

To experience an especially difficult or turbulent period or series of misfortune(s) or hardship(s). Primarily heard in Australia, New Zealand. The beleaguered celebrity family has been having a rough trot in recent months, as news of yet another scandal started hitting the media outlets this afternoon. I can't believe Jake's wife was diagnosed with cancer. They've really had a rough trot lately, haven't they?
See also: have, rough, trot

a rough trot

An especially difficult or turbulent period or series of misfortune(s) or hardship(s). Primarily heard in Australia, New Zealand. It's certainly been a rough trot for the beleaguered celebrity family, as news of yet another scandal started hitting the media outlets this afternoon. I can't believe Jake's wife was diagnosed with cancer. They've really had a rough trot lately, haven't they?
See also: rough, trot

on the trot

1. In quick succession, one after another. Primarily heard in UK. Relatively unknown in the boxing world until just a few years ago, he has won three world championship titles on the trot since 2016.
2. Consecutively over a certain period of time. Primarily heard in UK. Our team has been working for 23 days on the trot to get this product ready for its retail launch.
See also: on, trot

hot to trot

1. Eager or impatient to do something. Let's get going—the kids are hot to trot.
2. Sexually arousing or aroused. If you think he's so hot to trot, why don't you ask him out? I'm telling you, dude, when she smells your cologne, she'll be hot to trot!
See also: hot, trot

trot out

To bring someone or something out for other people to inspect, admire, or contemplate. A noun or pronoun can be used between "trot" and "out." Our parents trotted us out in our matching sweaters so all the relatives could have a good look. They've been trotting out the same line about consumer choices for years now, refusing to acknowledge the harmful effects their product has on people's health. My grandfather always trots his photo album out whenever we visit.
See also: out, trot

be hot to trot

1. To be eager or impatient to do something. Let's get going—the kids are hot to trot.
2. To be sexually arousing. If you think he's so hot to trot, why don't you ask him out?
See also: hot, trot

trot after someone

to follow along after someone, as done by a small dog. The puppy trotted along after the kids wherever they went. My little brother would always come trotting after us, annoying us a lot.
See also: after, trot

trot along

to step along in a lively fashion. The horses trotted along in time with the music. The horses were trotting along, going exactly where we led them.
See also: trot

trot someone or something out

to bring out and display someone or something. The boss trotted the new vice president out for us to meet. The boss trotted out his daughter and introduced her as a new vice president. Fred trotted out his favorite project for everyone to see.
See also: out, trot

trot something out

Fig. to mention something regularly or habitually, without giving it much thought. (Fig. on the image of trotting out a pony for display.) When James disagreed with Mary, she simply trotted her same old political arguments out. Bob always trots out the same excuses for being late.
See also: out, trot

hot to trot

1. Ready and willing, eager. For example, We should let them start putting up posters; they're hot to trot.
2. Sexually avid, lascivious, as in He's hot to trot and asked her out almost as soon as he met her. Both slangy usages allude to a horse eager to get going.
See also: hot, trot

trot out

Bring out and show for inspection and admiration, as in He trotted out all his old war medals. This expression alludes to leading out a horse to show off its various paces, including the trot. [Colloquial; first half of 1800s]
See also: out, trot

hot to trot

mainly AMERICAN, INFORMAL
1. If someone is hot to trot, they are sexually excited or sexually exciting. Donatella was my Italian dream — hot to trot.
2. If someone is hot to trot, they are eager to do something or have something. Ottawa Mayor Bob Chiarelli is hot to trot for more and better urban transport.
See also: hot, trot

on the trot

BRITISH, INFORMAL
COMMON If something happens several times on the trot, it happens that number of times without a break. It was their fifth win on the trot, a club record. She had worked 13 days on the trot before the accident.
See also: on, trot

hot to trot

ready and eager to engage in an activity. informal
See also: hot, trot

on the trot

1 in succession. 2 continually busy. British informal
See also: on, trot

be ˌhot to ˈtrot

(informal)
1 be very enthusiastic about starting an activity: She’s hot to trot and ready to start work next week if we want her to.
2 be excited in a sexual way
See also: hot, trot

on the ˈtrot

(British English, informal) one after the other: The bus has been late for five days on the trot.
See also: on, trot

trot off

v.
To proceed briskly: I left work at noon and trotted off to the gym.
See also: off, trot

trot out

v.
To bring out and show something or someone for inspection or admiration: The company trotted out a celebrity to endorse their product. Once politicians discover a topic the public responds to, they trot it out every election year.
See also: out, trot

backdoor trot(s)

n. a case of diarrhea. (From the time when people had to go out the back door to the outhouse.) I can’t go out tonight. I got a case of the backdoor trots.
See also: backdoor, trot

backdoor trot

verb
See also: backdoor, trot

the trots

n. a case of diarrhea. I got the trots and can’t go out tonight.
See also: trot

hot to trot

Slang
1. Sexually avid; lascivious.
2. Ready and willing; eager.
See also: hot, trot
References in periodicals archive ?
Each of these offenses are now reliably trotted out to justify suppressing unpopular expression as "hate speech," "fighting words," "unpatriotic," "subversive," or "inciting a riot.
The vets at York trotted him and everyone could see he was in discomfort.
Earlier, Teofilo had trotted for the first time since developing soreness behind his off-fore knee last week.
It trotted into the centre of Wunstorf, northern Germany, before making its unscheduled visit to the Sparkasse bank.
Trotted up last time at Ascot and should go well again.
During his career, the growly-throated reggae-pop crooner who was born Orville Richard Burrell fought in the Gulf War, won a Grammy Award and trotted straight to the top of the charts numerous times.
So much for all that nonsensical hype about them being "the greatest side the Premiership has seen" trotted out by some sports writers and a manager who we know is visually impaired.
Owner David Abell said yesterday: "He trotted up sound this morning and has eaten up well, so that is a great relief.
Wearing black riding pants and crisp yellow shirts, the riders, ages 9 to 18, trotted, loped and cantered around the riding ring as two judges and a crowd of spectators assessed their performance from the sidelines.
George Brett trotted to the dugout thinking his homer had given the Kansas City Royals a ninth-inning lead over the New York Yankees in 1983.
Instead, the Dodgers trotted out Robinson Checo in a pivotal game.
Fans in left field turned around to watch the ball bounce as a grinning McGwire trotted around the bases.