tripping

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trip balls

semi-vulgar slang To become intoxicated from a hallucinatory or psychoactive drug. Oh, Jim? Don't worry, he took some acid and is kind of tripping balls, but he'll be fine in a few hours.
See also: ball, trip

trip out

slang To become intoxicated from a hallucinatory or psychoactive drug. Oh, Jim? Don't worry, he took some acid and is kind of tripping out, but he'll be fine in a few hours.
See also: out, trip

trip off the tongue

To be very easy or enjoyable to say. When you name your food truck, make sure it's something that trips off the tongue so that people will remember it. The book is a joy to read aloud. The passages just trip off the tongue.
See also: off, tongue, trip

trip the light fantastic

To dance. Taken from the John Milton poem L'Allegro: "Come and trip it as ye go / On the light fantastic toe." Of course, the best part of a wedding is when everyone trips the light fantastic into the wee hours of the morning.
See also: light, trip

trip up

1. To trip, stumble, or lose one's footing. You're going to trip up walking around with your shoelaces untied like that!
2. To cause someone to trip, stumble, or lose their footing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "trip" and "up." Kids, don't go running around me while I'm cooking, or you might trip me up! He was given a yellow card for tripping up the other player.
3. To falter, stammer, hesitate, or make an error, mistake, or blunder. I tripped up during the presentation when I started reading off the wrong card.
4. To cause someone to falter, hesitate, or make an error. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "trip" and "up." She always tries to trip up her opponents with taunts and mind games. The crowd's boos and jeers really tripped me up during my turn.
See also: trip, up

trip someone up

 
1. Lit. to cause someone to trip; to entangle someone's feet. (Someone includes oneself.) The rope strewn about the deck tripped him up. The lines tripped up the crew.
2. Fig. to cause someone to falter while speaking, thinking, etc. Mary came in while the speaker was talking and the distraction tripped him up. The noise in the audience tripped up the speaker.
See also: trip, up

trip the light fantastic

Jocular to dance. Shall we go trip the light fantastic?
See also: light, trip

trip the light fantastic

Dance, as in Let's go out tonight and trip the light fantastic. This expression was originated by John Milton in L'Allegro (1632): "Come and trip it as ye go, On the light fantastick toe." The idiom uses trip in the sense of "a light, tripping step," and although fantastick was never the name of any particular dance, it survived and was given revived currency in James W. Blake's immensely popular song, The Sidewalks of New York (1894).
See also: light, trip

trip up

Make or cause someone to make a mistake, as in The other finalist tripped up when he was asked to spell "trireme," or They tripped him up with that difficult question. [Second half of 1700s]
See also: trip, up

trip the light fantastic

dance. humorous
This expression comes from the invitation to dance in John Milton 's poem ‘L'Allegro’ ( 1645 ): ‘Come, and trip it as ye go On the light fantastic toe’.
See also: light, trip

trip up

v.
1. To stumble or fall: I tripped up walking upstairs and hurt my ankle.
2. To cause someone to stumble or fall: The soccer player tripped up her opponent with a slide tackle. The broken stair tripped him up.
3. To make a mistake: I would have done better on the test if I hadn't tripped up on the last section.
4. To cause someone to make a mistake: His inability to focus on his work trips him up every time. The unclear phrasing of the question tripped her up.
See also: trip, up

trip the light fantastic

To dance.
See also: light, trip

trip the light fantastic

Dance. The phrase comes from John Milton's poem “L'Allegro”: “Come and trip it as ye go / On the light fantastic toe.” “Trip” did not mean to stub your toe and fall. On the contrary it meant “to move lightly and nimbly.”
See also: light, trip
References in periodicals archive ?
It begins with "Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue," and concludes about 45 lines later with "Go make you ready.
Morgan-Cole (something of a mouthful that: she might consider dispensing with the initial if she wants her name to come more trippingly off the bibliophilic tongue) is so anxious to keep herself honest that she provides an "Afterword" to The Violent Friendship of Esther Johnson in order to set the historical record straight.
As Hamlet said in a different context, it "falls trippingly from the tongue.
Jeffrey Cohen knows how to get actors to speak verse trippingly, instead of tripping over it.
Barton said, and she went, really trippingly, down the narrow walk between the budding hollyhocks.
Supported by a neat, pert little instrumental ensemble, Ex Cathedra responded trippingly to the music's characteristic dance-rhythms, their properly (but never ostentatiously) Gallicised Latin pronunciation adding point to the accentuation, and their trills at cadences delivered naturally and decisively.
trippingly on the tongue," StagePhone relies not on touch-tone phone menus but on voice-recognition technology.
follow one after another, capped by what remains one of the greatest showstoppers in musical comedy history--a pair of gangsters trippingly running through the Bard of Avon's catalogue in "Brush Up Your Shakespeare," for which Porter had to write two encores once he realized audiences weren't going to let the hoods get off the stage otherwise.
have coached execs on how to present themselves more persuasively in public and speak more trippingly.
Only Randy Nelson as Dromio of Ephesus manages to speak his speeches trippingly and to convey a sense that he thinks his jokes may be funny.
Actors with the ``rhythm'' and ``musicality'' of Americans - as Hall recently expressed his yearnings in print - who also can declaim Elizabethan meter as trippingly on the tongue as Lord Larry or Dame Judi.
The names Sakharov and Sharansky fall trippingly from the tongue, but the names of the faceless Plowshares dissidents are unknown to most of the American press and public.
Far more debatable are the contentions of die-hard Anglocentrics (including Bloom and John Simon) who insinuate that Americans are constitutionally unequipped to "speak the speech" as trippingly on the tongue as Brits do, or with an equal measure of sensibility and sense.