trickle

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trickle in

1. Of a liquid, to flow or seep in(to something) in drops or a thin stream. I thought I had waterproofed the windows, but rain keeps trickling in. He noticed seawater trickling into the hull of the boat.
2. To slowly enter or become available. Students were still trickling in nearly 15 minutes after the lecture began. Once we get a bit of cash trickling in, we can start buying better equipment.
See also: trickle

trickle away

1. Of a liquid, to flow out or away in drops or a thin stream. As the ice sculpture melted, it began tricking away into the grass. After dropping the jug, he just watched helplessly as all the wine trickled away.
2. To slowly disappear, dissipate, or become lost. As the clock ticks down, the team's hopes of reaching the playoffs continues to trickle away. Once last of our cash reserves trickles away, we'll have to file for bankruptcy.
See also: away, trickle

trickle down

1. Of a liquid, to flow or seep downward in drops or a thin stream. As the ice cream melted, it began tricking down Billy's arm. After dropping the jug, he just watched helplessly as all the wine trickled down the steps of the porch.
2. To distribute, pass, or diffuse to people lower on a hierarchical structure. The famous economical model posits that, should the wealthy be allowed to make as much money as possible, it will trickle down to everyone else in society. You're deluding yourself if you think power within the company is going to trickle down to you just because you're regional manager now.
See also: down, trickle

trickle through

1. Of a liquid, to flow through something in drops or a thin stream. I thought I had waterproofed the windows, but rain keeps trickling through them. Wine trickled through a tiny crack on the bottom of the jug.
2. To move through something or some place very slowly or a few at a time. People trickled through the door throughout the evening, and we actually had a decent crowd by the end of the night. News has only trickled through so far.
See also: through, trickle

trickle away

[for a liquid] to seep or dribble away. All the water trickled away down the drain. After the last of the spilled milk had trickled away, Timmy began to cry.
See also: away, trickle

trickle down

 (to someone or something)
1. Lit. [for a liquid] to seep or dribble downward to reach someone or something. The water trickled down the wall to the floor. It trickled down very slowly.
2. Fig. [for something] to be distributed to someone or something in little bits at a time. The results of the improved economy trickled down to people at lower-income levels. Information about what happened finally trickled down to me.
See also: down, trickle

trickle in

 (to something)
1. Lit. [for a liquid] to seep or dribble into something or a place. Some of the rainwater trickled into my car through a leak. It trickled in during the night.
2. Fig. [for someone or something] to come into something or a place, a few at a time. The audience trickled into the hall little by little. They trickled in over a period of an hour or more.
See also: trickle

trickle out

 (of something)
1. Lit. [for a liquid] to leak or dribble out of something or a place. The oil trickled out of the engine little by little. It trickled out and made a puddle on the floor.
2. Fig. [for someone or something] to go out of something or a place, a few at a time. The dissatisfied members of the audience trickled out of the theater three and four at a time. They trickled out as the evening wore on.
See also: out, trickle

trickle through

 (something)
1. Lit. [for a liquid] to seep through something. The water trickled through the cracked windowpane. They taped the glass, but the water trickled through anyway.
2. Fig. [for someone or something] to move through something little by little. The people trickled through the door into the store in far smaller numbers than we had expected. They trickled through very slowly.
See also: through, trickle

trickle down

v.
To diffuse downward through some hierarchical structure: The sociology professor believed that money rarely trickles down from the owners of capital to the workers who toil in the factories.
See also: down, trickle
References in periodicals archive ?
3 : to move slowly or in small numbers <Customers trickled in.>
Between 1998 and 2007, the fruits of growth did, indeed, reach all social strata, but they trickled mostly up rather than down.
Besides, I don't know about you, but I'm tired of being trickled on.
A young jazz band played as guests trickled in (many could not find their way since the university buildings were a maze).
The total economic loss to the region has been so far estimated between $30 and $40 million, and the effect has trickled down to businesses reliant on the industry all along the coast.
In the decade or so since, individual bishops have spoken out on this subject, some quite splendidly, but little of their social-justice teaching has trickled down to the Catholics in the pews.