trickle through

trickle through

1. Of a liquid, to flow through something in drops or a thin stream. I thought I had waterproofed the windows, but rain keeps trickling through them. Wine trickled through a tiny crack on the bottom of the jug.
2. To move through something or some place very slowly or a few at a time. People trickled through the door throughout the evening, and we actually had a decent crowd by the end of the night. News has only trickled through so far.
See also: through, trickle

trickle through

 (something)
1. Lit. [for a liquid] to seep through something. The water trickled through the cracked windowpane. They taped the glass, but the water trickled through anyway.
2. Fig. [for someone or something] to move through something little by little. The people trickled through the door into the store in far smaller numbers than we had expected. They trickled through very slowly.
See also: through, trickle
References in periodicals archive ?
1 : to trickle or cause to trickle through something porous : ooze <Water percolated through sand.>
The Fed halted its two year long series of 17 consecutive quarter point interest rates rises over the summer not only to let its policy firming actions trickle through the economy and take hold, but also because the Fed was fearful of further crimping economic growth, which had plummeted from its scorching pace in the first quarter of 2006.