treasure

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buried treasure

1. Literally, treasure (such as gold, jewels, or other valuable items) that has been buried under sand or lays hidden in the ocean. Every kid dreams of finding buried treasure at the beach.
2. Anything that has lain dormant or undiscovered for a long period of time that, upon discovery, is found to be of great value. The writer, who was unknown in his lifetime, became hugely popular after the buried treasure of his unpublished manuscript was discovered among his belongings.
See also: bury, treasure

one man's trash is another man's treasure

What one person may consider worthless could be highly prized or valued by someone else. A: "I really don't understand the appeal of Jackson Pollock paintings—they just look like paint splatters to me!" B: "Eh, one man's trash is another man's treasure."
See also: another, one, trash, treasure

One man's trash is another man's treasure.

Prov. Something that one person considers worthless may be considered valuable by someone else. Q: Why would anyone want to hang a picture like that on the wall? A: One man's trash is another man's treasure. A: Bob's uncle is always going through people's garbage, looking for old stuff. B: One man's trash is another man's treasure.
See also: another, one, trash, treasure
References in classic literature ?
At this news I became almost beside myself with joy and greed, and I flung my arms round the neck of the dervish, exclaiming: "Good dervish, I see plainly that the riches of this world are nothing to you, therefore of what use is the knowledge of this treasure to you?
It was open to me to keep my secret, and to reserve the treasure for myself.
He did not mention the mutiny or the chest of buried treasure.
His letter described the island minutely, as well as the location of the treasure, and was accompanied by the crudest, funniest little old map you ever saw; with trees and rocks all marked by scrawly X's to show the exact spot where the treasure had been buried.
Yet, unless he felt a lurking distrust of the golden tale, it is difficult to account for his permitting the paternal roof to stand so long, since he had never yet seen the moment when his predecessor's treasure would not have found plenty of room in his own strong box.
"To-morrow, at sunrise," he repeated, taking his lamp to retire to bed, "I'll see whether this treasure be hid in the wall of the garret."
No mere money would begin to pay the value of this treasure, the sifted pickings of centuries of war, plunder, trade, and taxation.
"The treasure I speak of really exists, and I offer to sign an agreement with you, in which I promise to lead you to the spot where you shall dig; and if I deceive you, bring me here again, -- I ask no more."
Others, that he was one of the ancient comrades of Kidd or Bradish, returned to convey away treasures formerly hidden in the vicinity.
The whole value of the recovered treasure, plate, bullion, precious stones, and all, was estimated at more than two millions of dollars.
I have another treasure here which I must not lose, but I can arrange that it will still be here when I return for it, and then Barunda's uncle can come back with me to assist me if assistance is needed.
My fault lies in the fact that we concealed not only the body, but also the treasure, and that I have clung to Morstan's share as well as to my own.
A moment later he stood within the treasure chamber, where, ages since, long-dead hands had ranged the lofty rows of precious ingots for the rulers of that great continent which now lies submerged beneath the waters of the Atlantic.
"Maybe you haven't guessed it," the Ancient Mariner said; "but this is my fourth voyage after this treasure."
The report of the treasure went down indeed among the people who lived in the country from age to age, but none knew where the chamber was, nor the secret of the door.