travel

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mile a minute

At a very rapid pace. Taylor was so excited to tell me about her first day at school that she was talking a mile a minute.
See also: mile, minute

at a good clip

Quickly; at a fast pace. That horse is moving at a good clip—I think he might win the race!
See also: clip, good

bad news travels fast

Bad news circulates quickly (because people are apt to hear it and then share it with others). A: "How does the whole school already know that I got suspended?" B: "Well, bad news travels fast."
See also: bad, fast, news, travel

have (something), will travel

A phrase used when one has the ability or skill to do something and could do it anywhere. Once you get your degree, you can do anything you want with your life—have degree, will travel!
See also: have, travel, will

travel light

To travel without bringing much luggage. I hate lugging around a big suitcase, so I always try to travel light.
See also: light, travel

off the beaten track

Little-known or in a remote or lesser-known area, as of a place or business. A "beaten track" refers to a route that is heavily traveled. We'll definitely be able to get a table at that restaurant, it's really off the beaten track. I chose that island as a vacation spot because I knew it was off the beaten track and would give me some much-needed solitude.
See also: beaten, off, track

*at a good clip

 and *at a fast clip
rapidly. (*Typically: go ~; move ~; run ~; travel ~.) We were moving along at a good clip when a state trooper stopped us.
See also: clip, good

Bad news travels fast.

Prov. Information about trouble or misfortune disseminates quickly (more quickly than good news). John: Hi, Andy. I'm sorry to hear you got fired. Andy: How did you know about that already? It only happened this morning. John: Bad news travels fast. I called my mother to tell her about my car accident, but my aunt had already told her. Bad news travels fast.
See also: bad, fast, news, travel

He travels fastest who travels alone.

Prov. It is easier to achieve your goals if you do not have a spouse, children, or other connections to consider. Jill: Don't go yet! Wait for me to get ready. Jane: But you always take at least half an hour. No wonder they always say that he travels fastest who travels alone.
See also: alone, fast, he, travel, who

*in a body

Fig. as a group of people; as a group; in a group. (*Typically: arrive some place ~; go ~; leave ~; reach some place ~; travel ~.) The tour members always traveled in a body.
See also: body

It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.

Prov. You should enjoy the process of doing something, rather than anticipate the result of doing it. Bill: I can't wait till I get my high school diploma. Fred: You should concentrate on enjoying high school instead. It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.
See also: arrive, better, travel

*mile a minute

Fig. very fast. (*Typically: go ~; move ~; talk ~; travel ~.) She talks a mile a minute and is very hard to keep up with.
See also: mile, minute

*off the beaten track

 and *off the beaten path
Fig. away from the frequently traveled routes. (*Typically: be ~; go ~; travel ~.) We found a nice little Italian restaurant off the beaten track.
See also: beaten, off, track

travel across something

to make a journey across something or some place. We have to travel across the desert to get there. I do not want to travel across that rickety bridge on the way back.
See also: across, travel

Travel broadens the mind.

Prov. When you travel, you learn things about the people and places you see. Marie: I never realized how well-off most Americans are until I visited India. Jane: So it's true that travel broadens the mind, huh? Everyone who gets the chance should go abroad. Travel broadens the mind.
See also: broaden, mind, travel

travel by something

 
1. to make a journey, using a particular conveyance. I will go by train, since I don't like to travel by plane. We traveled by car, since that is the cheapest.
2. to make a journey under particular conditions. I don't ever travel by night. We like to travel by day so we can see the scenery.
See also: by, travel

travel for someone or something

to go from place to place selling for someone or a company. Walter travels for his uncle, who runs a toy factory. She travels for a company that makes men's clothing.
See also: travel

travel on something

 
1. to make a journey on a particular conveyance. Do you like to travel on the train? I do not care to travel on the bus.
2. to travel having certain bodily states, such as on an empty stomach, on a full stomach. I hate traveling on a full stomach. I can't stand to travel on a full stomach.
See also: on, travel

travel over something

 
1. to go over something as part of a journey. We had to travel over an old bridge over the Mississippi to get to my sister's house. We will travel over a long narrow strip of land to get to the marina.
2. to travel widely over a great area. She spent the summer traveling over Europe. I have traveled over the entire country and never failed to find someone I could talk to.
See also: over, travel

travel through something

 
1. to make a journey through some area or country. We will have to travel through Germany to get there. Do you want to travel through the desert or through the mountains?
2. to make a journey through some kind of weather condition. I hate to travel through the rain. I refuse to travel through a snowstorm.
See also: through, travel

travel with someone

 
1. to associate with someone; to move about in association with someone. She travels with a sophisticated crowd. I am afraid that Walter is traveling with the wrong group of friends.
2. to make a journey with someone. Do you mind if I travel with you? Who are you going to travel with?
See also: travel

travel with something

to have something with one as one travels. I always travel with extra money. I hate to travel with three suitcases. That is more than I can handle.
See also: travel

off the beaten track

An unusual route or destination, as in We found a great vacation spot, off the beaten track. This term alludes to a well-worn path trodden down by many feet and was first recorded in 1860, although the phrase beaten track was recorded in 1638 in reference to the usual, unoriginal way of doing something.
See also: beaten, off, track

travel light

Take little baggage; also, be relatively free of responsibilities or deep thoughts, as in I can be ready in half an hour; I always travel light, or I don't want to buy a house and get tied down; I like to travel light, or It's hard to figure out whom they'll attack next, because ideologically they travel light . The literal use dates from the 1920s, the figurative from the mid-1900s.
See also: light, travel

off the beaten track

BRITISH or

off the beaten path

AMERICAN
COMMON If a place is off the beaten track, it is far away from places where most people live or go. The house is sufficiently off the beaten track to deter all but a few tourists. Rents at these malls, which are generally off the beaten path, are lower than at most suburban shopping centers. Note: A track here is a footpath or narrow road.
See also: beaten, off, track

off the beaten track (or path)

1 in or into an isolated place. 2 unusual.
2 1992 Iain Banks The Crow Road ‘Your Uncle Hamish…’ She looked troubled. ‘He's a bit off the beaten track, that boy.’
See also: beaten, off, track

off the ˌbeaten ˈtrack

far away from where people normally live or go: Our house is a bit off the beaten track.
See also: beaten, off, track

travel ˈlight

travel with very little luggage: We’re travelling light with one small bag each.
See also: light, travel
References in periodicals archive ?
Public transport has been one of the main travel modes in urban areas due to its comprehensive service for travelers and big influence on urban traffic systems.
During his recent visit to the World Travel Market (WTM) in Excel, London, the MD/CEO Kaduk Travels and Tours, Mr Kolawole Arogundade, who made is debut to the travel market disclosed to Travelpulse and MICE that the platform was a springboard for his company in the travel business.
Travel Business Review-November 27, 2012--Kuoni Travel Announces New Kuoni Travel Blog(C)2012] ENPublishing - http://www.enpublishing.co.uk
The travel agencies who pitted their skills against those of their competitors included: Darwish Travels, Mannai Travels, Overseas Travels, United Tours and Travels, Kanoo Travel, Qatar Tours, Alshamel Travels, Regency Travels, Happy Journey, Falcon Travels, Tourist Travels and Jet Travels.
NORDIC BUSINESS REPORT-13 November 2008-Ticket Travel Group AB acquires Finnish company Mr Travel Oy Ab(C)1994-2008 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.m2.com
The third chapter tracks the travels of white transcendentalist writer Margaret Fuller to the American Great Lakes in 1843, and reads her "epistemological" quest westward to the American frontier as a hybrid text, a poetic ethnography that blends autobiography, history, critical reading, and a gender and race-based analysis of expansionism.
Depending on where the team travels, the first priority is to minimize loss of classes.
More in-depth accounts of Richard Wright's travels may be found in Richard Wright's Travel Writings: New Reflections.
E's editors wish you safe travels, and by all means, send us a postcard!
The sound of closing car doors, pedestrians' foot falls as they step in and out of stores, and odors from a bakery, bar, feed and grain, or hardware store provide blind travelers with a wealth of information about the shops they pass on their travels. A particular business is located in much the same manner as it would be in a larger town or city.
This carefully edited volume presents three little-known seventeenth-century plays centering on travel and exploration, two of which are published here for the first time in a modern critical edition: Day, Rowley, and Wilkins's The Travels of the Three English Brothers (first staged 1607) and Fletcher and Massinger's The Sea Voyage (first staged 1622).
Wen Peter Sontag travels, he often hits the road on his Harley-Davidson motorcycle.
If an employee returns from an out-of-town business meeting on Friday night or during the daytime on Saturday or travels to a Monday meeting on Sunday, a considerably higher cost will be incurred for the air travel.
Luxury Travel Ltd (www.luxurytravelvietnam.com ) offers a complete range of unique itineraries along with a tailor-made itinerary service, and can arrange all aspects of travels, right down to making dinner reservations, helicopter tours, or a private cruise, nothing is impossible.
Placed under the aspect of the "new reflections" embodied in this book edited by Virginia Whatley Smith, the travels undertaken by Wright later in his career reveal a complex dialectic.