traveled


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

take the path less chosen

To choose the less popular or common option. I took the path less chosen when I decided not to go to college, unlike all of my siblings. Quitting your job to do art full-time is certainly taking the path less chosen, but has it made you any happier?
See also: chosen, less, path, take

take the road less traveled

To pursue a less popular or common option. The phrase is typically associated with Robert Frost's 1916 poem, "The Road Not Taken." I have always encouraged my children to take the road less traveled in life, instead of simply going along with what everyone else thinks is the right path. You certainly took the road less traveled when you quit your job to do art full-time, but are you any happier than you were before?
See also: less, road, take, traveled

the road less traveled

The less popular or common option. The phrase is typically associated with Robert Frost's 1916 poem "The Road Not Taken." I took the road less traveled when I decided not to go to college, unlike all of my siblings. Quitting your job to do art full-time is certainly the road less traveled, but has it made you happier?
See also: less, road, traveled

travel across (something or some place)

To move or journey from one side of something or some place to the other. We'll need to travel across the swamp in order to reach the village. He traveled across Europe on foot as part of his pilgrimage. I have to travel across this bridge every day as part of my commute.
See also: across, travel

travel all over (some place)

To move or journey across a large or wide area of some place. She has traveled all over the world as part of her job. The politician is traveling all over the state for his reelection campaign.
See also: all, over, travel

travel at a fast clip

To move quickly or at a fast pace. That horse is traveling at a fast clip—I think he might win the race!
See also: clip, fast, travel

travel by (something)

1. To move or journey using some particular type of transportation. I chose to travel by sea because it was so much cheaper than flying, but it was not worth it considering how long and unpleasant the journey was. The whole area is under four feet of snow, so we'll have to travel by dogsled.
2. To move or journey during either night- or daytime. We were traveling by night in order to avoid detection. I recommend traveling by day so you can appreciate the beauty of the whole area.
3. To move or journey while making use of a particular source of light. We traveled by lamplight through the spooky forest. Our flashlight was broken, so we had to travel by moonlight.
See also: by, travel

travel for (something)

1. To travel (to various places) as a part of one's employment. I travel for work a lot, so I don't get to see my kids as much as I would like. She swore she would never travel for a job again after that.
2. To travel (to one or more places) for some purpose or reason. I decided to go traveling for my 50th birthday. He'll be traveling for a conference next week.
See also: travel

travel in a body

To go to some place in a group Why do we have to travel in a body? I'd rather not be stuck in a car with my whole family for hours on end, thanks.
See also: body, travel

travel light

To travel without bringing much luggage. I hate lugging around a big suitcase, so I always try to travel light.
See also: light, travel

travel on (one's) own

To travel alone. I thought it would be really lonely traveling on my own, but it was actually very enjoyable and peaceful. I just worry about him traveling on his own like that.
See also: on, own, travel

travel on (something)

1. To move or journey atop some surface or along some path. We won't be able to travel on the main road until they've finished their work. I hate traveling on water. I always get so seasick.
2. To move or journey using some particular mode of transportation. I really don't mind traveling on the bus. It gives me a chance to catch up on some reading. I didn't travel on an airplane until I was nearly 30 years old. Our car broke down halfway there, so we had to travel on foot for the rest of the way.
3. To move or journey while carrying some kind of pass or authorization. If you're over 66 in Ireland, you can travel on their Free Travel Scheme all over the country! You can travel on your student visa around the rest of Europe, but you'll have to bring your proof of enrollment with you wherever you go.
See also: on, travel

travel on a full/empty stomach

To travel while one is either full or very hungry. I was going to just wake up and head out the door, but my mother wouldn't let me travel on an empty stomach. Trust me, you'll have a much more pleasant journey if you're traveling on a full stomach.
See also: empty, full, on, stomach, travel

travel over (something or some place)

1. To move or journey from one side of something to the other. We'll need to travel over the desert in order to reach the village. I travel over this bridge every day as part of my commute.
2. To move or journey across a large or wide area of some place. In this usage, the word "all" can be used between "travel" and "over." She has traveled all over the world as part of her job. The politician is traveling over the state for his reelection campaign.
See also: over, travel

travel through (something or some place)

1. To move or journey in one side of something and out another. We'll be traveling through a long tunnel shortly, so you won't get any reception on your cell phones for a while. We should travel through the forest to reach the camp quicker.
2. To move or journey around or across something or some place. The crew will travel through space for nearly three months on their way to Mars. I'm traveling through France on my way to Spain.
3. To move or journey among or between something. I'd been traveling through the trees for some time with no sign of the village anywhere. Unfortunately, there was no way to avoid traveling through the gloopy mud.
4. To move or journey during a particular kind of weather. We were traveling through such thick fog that we could barely see a foot in front of us. You should never travel through a lightning storm on foot.
See also: through, travel

travel with (someone or something)

1. To make a journey while in the company of someone. She's traveling with her friend Mary across Europe this summer. They're just at that age where they don't want to travel with their parents anymore.
2. To make a journey while supervising or accompanying someone or some animal. I'll be traveling with some students from my class to Washington, DC, next month. That's the last time I ever travel with my pets on an airplane!
3. To bring something with one while making a journey. Why on earth are you traveling with so many pieces of luggage? I always travel with a portable charger for my phone.
4. To make a journey while suffering from some illness, injury, or ailment. You really shouldn't travel with the flu. I don't know how I'm going to travel with this broken leg.
See also: travel

travel light

Take little baggage; also, be relatively free of responsibilities or deep thoughts, as in I can be ready in half an hour; I always travel light, or I don't want to buy a house and get tied down; I like to travel light, or It's hard to figure out whom they'll attack next, because ideologically they travel light . The literal use dates from the 1920s, the figurative from the mid-1900s.
See also: light, travel

travel ˈlight

travel with very little luggage: We’re travelling light with one small bag each.
See also: light, travel
References in periodicals archive ?
Each state in which the vehicle traveled or purchased fuel.
A licensee whose total miles traveled for the year are less than 5,000 miles (or 8,000 kilometers) in all member jurisdictions other than the base jurisdiction may request to file annually.
Other information in a given setting can be useful if put in context with the route being traveled. The hum of electrical wires along the county road, the rustle of a lone tree somewhere en route and myriad other cues can be used in combination with directional orientation to navigate the country lane.
"We'd like to run daily service from Cuba to New York," says Continental's Bethune, who joined a business group that traveled to the island earlier this year.
"I remember fairly large hotel phone bills when I traveled in the U.S.
Department of Commerce, 3.4 million international visitors traveled to the U.S.
Although African Americans generally traveled alone, they also participated in group tours twice as much as other minorities.(7) Overnight trips averaged 4.4 nights and African Americans indicated that they were more likely to stay in hotels, motels, private homes or bed-and-breakfast inns.(8)