transpose


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transpose something (from something) (to something)

 and transpose something (from something) (into something)
to change something, usually in music, from one musical key to another. Can you transpose this from F-sharp to a higher key? It would be easy to transpose it into a higher key.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based in part on this feedback, planned improvements to MEDLINE Transpose include: a multiline entry field, recognition of tagless "Filter" style limits in PubMed and codeless limits in Ovid syntax, and the option to choose between the most accurate and a more efficiency-based conversion.
To find the key to transpose to, add the two flats of the key of B-flat (the name of the instrument): [?
Poland has failed to fully transpose and implement the Directive at national level.
The European Parliament, meeting in plenary in Strasbourg on 13 December, approved the common position adopted at first reading in Council on the draft regulation that transposes into EU law the provisions applicable to fisheries in the zone covered by the General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean (GFCM).
Portugal, Cyprus and the Czech Republic have not yet communicated the measures under national law to transpose that directive.
Users can determine the notes in a given scale, find the notes in any chord, transpose from one key to another, find an unknown key knowing only one corresponding note or chord within the known (present key) and within the unknown key (final key), determine CAPO positioning on the guitar, determine the number of sharps or flats in a particular key signature and more.
The European Commission is referring Bulgaria, Estonia and the United Kingdom to the Court of Justice of the European Union for failing to fully transpose the EU internal energy market rules, EC said Thursday.
The European Commission has decided to refer the Czech Republic to the Court of Justice of the EU for failing to correctly transpose and implement Directive 2004/49/EC on safety on the Community's railways.
Under the Lisbon Treaty, which entered into force on 1 December 2009, if Member States fail to transpose EU legislation into national law within the required deadline, the Commission may ask the Court to impose financial sanctions when referring the case for the first time.
Luxembourg, which was already condemned by the Court on 19 May, and Spain are the only two member states that have failed to transpose both gas and electricity directives.
All 27 EU countries were required to transpose most of the provisions in the EU's third power and gas market opening directives, adopted in 2009, by March 3, 2011 and to inform the EC of them.
The European Commission decided, on 26 June, to refer nine member states - Austria, Belgium (Brussels Region), Greece, Finland, France, Ireland, Luxembourg, Slovenia and the United Kingdom - to the EU Court of Justice for failure to transpose Directive 2004/35/EC on liability for environmental damage into their national laws.
The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg was condemned on 18 May by the European Court of Justice (case C-354/05) for failing to transpose the Directive on gas market liberalisation (2003/55/EC), which should have been grafted onto national statute books by 1 July 2004.
Athens, Berlin and Vienna will have to explain to the EU Court of Justice the reasons for their continuing failure to transpose the Services Directive (2006/123/EC) and may end up with substantial penalty payments.
The Commission is acting against Finland for failure to fully transpose and implement the Community legislation on the control of ships by the port state (Directive 95/21/EC), which sets common criteria for the inspection of ships passing through Community ports.