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translate (something) from (something)

To adapt the meaning of some piece of speech or writing from its original language (into a different language). The phrase "into something" can be used before or after "from something" to specify the different language. I was hired to translate the company's technical documents from Russian into English. You can learn a lot of idioms and slang by translating song lyrics from French. We've been trying to translate these texts into English from Ancient Greek.
See also: translate

translate (something) from (something) into (something)

To adapt the meaning of some piece of speech or writing from its original language into a different language. I was hired to translate the company's technical documents from Russian into English. You can learn a lot of idioms and slang by translating song lyrics from French into your native language. We've been trying to translate these texts from Ancient Greek into English.
See also: translate

translate (something) into (something)

1. To render some piece of speech or writing into a different language. The phrase "from something" can be used before or after "into something" to specify the original language. I was hired to translate the company's technical documents into Russian. You can learn a lot of idioms and slang by translating song lyrics from English into French. We've been trying to translate these texts into English from Ancient Greek.
2. To render or express some piece of speech or writing in different, usually simpler or clearer words. The book tries to translate some of the more complex theory and jargon into more straightforward English, but it loses a lot of the nuance and depth in the process. You'll have to translate these shorthand notes into longhand for me.
3. To render or express some piece of writing, music, film, etc., in a different artistic medium. As good as the graphic novel is, I just don't think it can be translated into a cohesive, meaningful film. He is attempting to translate his most famous play into opera.
4. To render, convert, transform, or express something from one form or state into another. I can come up with really interesting story ideas, but I always have trouble translating them into writing. She was considered one of the brightest up-and-coming athletes, but so far she hasn't been able to translate her potential into meaningful success.
See also: translate

translate (something) into (something) from (something)

To adapt the meaning of some piece of speech or writing from its original language into a different language. I was hired to translate the company's technical documents into English from Russian. You can learn a lot of idioms and slang by translating song lyrics into your native language from French. We've been trying to translate these texts into English from Ancient Greek.
See also: translate

translate (something) to (something)

1. To render some piece of speech or writing into a different language. The phrase "from something" can be used before or after "to something" to specify the original language. I was hired to translate the company's technical documents to Russian. You can learn a lot of idioms and slang by translating song lyrics from English to French. We've been trying to translate these texts to English from Ancient Greek.
2. To render or express some piece of speech or writing in different, usually simpler or clearer words. The book tries to translate some of the more complex theory and jargon to more straightforward English, but it loses a lot of the nuance and depth in the process. You'll have to translate these shorthand notes to longhand for me.
3. To render or express some piece of writing, music, film, etc., in a different artistic medium. As good as the graphic novel is, I just don't think it can be translated to a cohesive, meaningful film. He is attempting to translate his most famous play to opera.
4. To render, convert, transform, or express something from one form or state into another. I can come up with really interesting story ideas, but I always have trouble translating them to writing. She was considered one of the brightest up-and-coming athletes, but so far she hasn't been able to translate her potential to meaningful success.
See also: translate

translate something (from something) (to something)

 and translate something (from something) (into something)
to decode something from something, such as a language, to another. Will you please translate this from Russian into English? I can translate it into Russian from any Romance language.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the discussion above, several things can be noted about the translatability of the divine names El and Baal in ancient Israel.
In "The Translator's Task", Benjamin uses "pure language" as a constant of translatability, that is to say, the ability of the 'original' (the poetic in this case) to adapt to other contexts and be translated throughout the ages.
(8.) Wolfgang Iser, "On Translatability: Variables of Interpretation," The European English Messenger IV:1 (Spring 1995): 30-38; 30.
Philo, then, was a pivotal figure in the introduction of translatability into the Jewish worldview.
The central argument of this essay is that reading Chinese-Latin American authors through the lens of translatability as a complex problem enables the reader to understand the unique voice of the postmigration generation.
It introduces many foundational themes of the practice of translation such as authenticity, translatability, the idea of "pure language" and the stricture between fidelity and freedom in translational practices.
When translatability between languages collapses so too does the idea that we are talking about two languages at all.
For those interested in theology in a multireligious world, this study offers surprisingly new resources, especially on the issues of translatability ' and the point of interfaith dialogue and comparative work.
Rejecting the notion of a "trans-cultural theology" that is "universally true for all cultures" (264-94), he affirms the translatability of the Gospel into every culture as something crucial that enables ownership of the faith by all peoples.
Section 2.i of the article (162-168), which discusses the translatability of metaphor, seems largely obvious, while section 2.2 (168-175), "Cognitive approaches to metaphor translation," requires exemplification, although it does provide a useful review of the papers published in this field.
Hamilton's analysis of the term "security" is not just concerned with translatability and politics but shifts the entire focus of the discussion by "marshaling philology in the name of untested configurations: Homeland Security with security blanket [....] security has become the late-twentieth and early twenty-first-century watchword of choice, a control-term for every aspect of private and political life" (131).
For example, a corollary to the issue of the translatability of religion in secularist terms might be deep ecology's effort to accord intrinsic value to nature, which can founder on its incommensurability with classical liberalism.
This comparison appears to support the case for translatability of the progression of T2D in ZDSD model to the human disease.
To Derrida, the issue is not about translatability or fidelity; instead, it is about relevance.