References in classic literature ?
The train stopped, at eight o'clock, in the midst of a glade some fifteen miles beyond Rothal, where there were several bungalows, and workmen's cabins.
The train entered the defiles of the Sutpour Mountains, which separate the Khandeish from Bundelcund, towards evening.
"I saw you arrive - just too late for the train. While I was swearing at the inspector, I heard you speak to the station-master.
Can I beg a seat in your compartment, or anywhere in the train, as far as Harwich?"
Well, you get along for a bit, but soon find yourself in a long train of carts and carriages all obliged to go at a walk; perhaps you come to a regular block-up, and have to stand still for minutes together, till something clears out into a side street, or the policeman interferes; you have to be ready for any chance -- to dash forward if there be an opening, and be quick as a rat-dog to see if there be room and if there be time, lest you get your own wheels locked or smashed, or the shaft of some other vehicle run into your chest or shoulder.
In and out, in and out we went, as fast as horseflesh could do it, and for a wonder had a good clear time on London Bridge, for there was a whole train of cabs and carriages all going our way at a quick trot, perhaps wanting to catch that very train.
One has no difficulty in remembering his sins while the train is creeping down this bridge; and he repents of them, too; though he sees, when he gets to Vitznau, that he need not have done it, the bridge was perfectly safe.
* This was reputed to be the fastest train in the world then.
I asked the maid in the dressing-room how late the train was, and she told me two hours.
Give my love to Lady Brandon, and Agatha, and the dear children; and thanks so much for a very pleasant--" Here the train moved off, and Sir Charles, melting, smiled and waved his hat until he caught sight of Trefusis looking back at him with a grin which seemed, under the circumstances, so Satanic, that he stopped as if petrified in the midst of his gesticulations, and stood with his arm out like a semaphore.
The whistle had blown and the train had panted on to get help from the next station.
of us, under the easy circumstance of our own weakness, remains another way most easily to express ourselves for the purpose of eliminating from the world the cruelty that is practised by some few of us, for the entertainment of the rest of us, on the trained animals, who, after all, are only lesser animals than we on the round world's surface.
It is a matter of training, and the English are better trained, that is all.
It is a habit of mind to which I have been trained all my life.
Much of what I have said has been written on board trains, or at hotels or railroad stations while I have been waiting for trains, or during the moments that I could spare from my work while at Tuskegee.