towering


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tower above (someone or something)

To be much taller than someone or something else. They're almost comical together because he towers above her so much. The mighty new skyscraper towers above the city.
See also: above, tower

tower head and shoulders above (someone or something)

1. To be much taller than someone or something. The couple is almost comical when they're together because he towers head and shoulders above her. The mighty new skyscraper towers head and shoulders above the city.
2. To be significantly better, more impressive, or more important than someone or something. I think John should definitely get the job—he towered head and shoulders above all the other applicants in his interview. So far, the company's latest product towers head and shoulders above its competitors' similar offerings.
See also: above, and, head, shoulder, tower

tower head and shoulders over (someone or something)

1. To be much taller than someone or something. The couple is almost comical when they're together because he towers head and shoulders over her. The mighty new skyscraper towers head and shoulders over the city.
2. To be significantly better, more impressive, or more important than someone or something. I think John should definitely get the job—he towered head and shoulders over all the other applicants in his interview. So far, the company's latest product towers head and shoulders over its competitors' similar offerings.
See also: and, head, over, shoulder, tower

tower over (someone or something)

To be much taller than someone or something else. They're almost comical together because he towers over her so much. The mighty new skyscraper towers over the city.
See also: over, tower

towering rage, in a

Extremely angry. Towering has been used in the sense of rising to a pitch of violence or intensity since Shakespeare’s time. Shakespeare wrote, “The brauery of his griefe did put me into a towring passion” (Hamlet, 5.2). The precise modern locution appeared in William Black’s Green Pastures and Piccadilly (1877), “He came down in a towering rage.” It may now be obsolescent.
See also: towering