touch on


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touch on (something)

To discuss or deal with some topic informally or in passing. We'll touch on that matter later in the meeting, so let's stay focused on the issue at hand. She touched on the problem, but she didn't get a chance to explain exactly what had happened. The movie touches on themes of loneliness and grief, but doesn't make them the central focus of the characters.
See also: on, touch
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

touch (up)on something

Fig. to mention something; to talk about something briefly. In tomorrow's lecture I'd like to touch on the matter of taxation. The teacher only touched upon the subject. There wasn't time to do more than that.
See also: on, touch

touch on something

Fig. to mention something; to talk about something briefly. In tomorrow's lecture I'd like to touch on the matter of taxation. The teacher only touched on the subject. There wasn't time to do more than that.
See also: on, touch
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

touch on

Also, touch upon.
1. Mention briefly or casually in passing, as in He barely touched on the subject of immigration. [First half of 1600s]
2. Approach closely, verge on, as in This frenzy touched on clinical insanity. [Early 1800s]
See also: on, touch
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

touch on

or touch upon
v.
1. To deal with some topic in passing: The speech touched on all the important issues but never really discussed them.
2. To relate to someone or something; concern someone or something: The problem of poverty touches on every level of society.
3. To approach the nature or condition of something; come close to something: The fan's excitement touched on clinical insanity.
See also: on, touch
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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