touch


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touch (oneself)

euphemistic slang To masturbate. My ultra-religious aunt scared us silly when we went through puberty with all sorts of myths about what would happen if we touched ourselves.
See also: touch

touch

1. n. a likely target for begging; someone who is asked for a loan. (see also soft touch.) He was just the kind of touch we were looking for, not too bright and not too poor.
2. n. a request for money (from a beggar); a request for a loan. I ignored the touch and walked on by.
3. tv. to ask someone for a loan. He touched me for a hundred bucks.
4. n. a small portion of something to eat or drink. (Folksy.) I’ll have just a touch. I’m on a diet, you know.
5. tv. to deal with or handle someone or something. (Usually in the negative.) Mr. Wilson is a real pain, and I wouldn’t touch his account. Find somebody else to handle it.

touch

base/bases Informal
To renew a line of communication: "He went out of his way to touch base with a broad cross section of ... residents" (George B. Merry).
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
Touch is an important and personal way of communicating.
Maybe it also explains why we pay the folks who offer tender loving care in our nurseries and nursing homes so little money, because we don't value touch enough.
Therapeutic touch is a form of using expressive touch in a way that purposefully directs compassion and an intention to help toward the person needing care.
5 : a state of contact or communication <It is important to keep in touch with friends.
To determine whether three weeks of human touch would affect growth patterns, the researchers measured the lengths of the stems and stalks of untouched plants and compared them with plants touched twice daily.