torch

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carry the torch for (someone)

To be in love with someone, especially secretly and/or unrequitedly. I've carried the torch for her since high school, but I've never been able to tell her how I feel. Susan carried the torch for him for years after they broke up.
See also: carry, torch

hand on the torch

To give something to someone else, often one's position and/or responsibilities. Because Gina is retiring, she is handing on the torch to me, and I'll take over her job as supervisor. My grandmother is unable to stand long enough to cook such a large meal, so we're making Thanksgiving dinner this year—she has handed on the torch to us.
See also: hand, on, torch

carry a torch for (one)

To be in love with one, especially secretly and/or unrequitedly. I've carried a torch for her since high school, but I've never been able to tell her how I feel. Susan carried a torch for him for years after they broke up.
See also: carry, torch

carry the torch

To fight for someone or something and encourage or lead others to do the same. While you hate the idea of this big construction project and are ready to carry the torch, you should know that most of the townspeople have been very vocal in their support of it.
See also: carry, torch

pass the torch

To give something to someone else, often one's position and/or responsibilities. Because Gina is retiring, she is passing the torch to me as head of the department. My grandmother is unable to stand long enough to cook such a large meal, so she's passing the torch to us to make Thanksgiving dinner this year.
See also: pass, torch

put (something) to the torch

To set fire to something with the deliberate intention of destroying it. The soldiers stormed through the village, putting homes to the torch as they went. Many holy scriptures of the religion were put to fire during the war.
See also: put, torch

carry a torch (for someone)

 and carry the torch (for someone)
Fig. to be in love with someone who is not in love with you; to brood over a hopeless love affair. John is carrying a torch for Jane. Is John still carrying a torch after all this time?
See also: carry, torch

carry the torch

 
1. Fig. to lead or participate in a (figurative) crusade. The battle was over, but John continued to carry the torch. If Jane hadn't carried the torch, no one would have followed, and the whole thing would have failed.
2. Go to carry a torch (for someone).
See also: carry, torch

carry a torch for

Also, carry the torch for. Continue to feel the pain of unreciprocated love for, as in Jane has been carrying the torch for Bill for at least a year. The torch in this term alludes to the heat of love or passion. [1920s]
See also: carry, torch

pass the torch

Also, hand on the torch. Relinquish responsibilities, a tradition, practice, or knowledge to another. For example, When the company's founder became too ill to continue, he passed the torch to his nephew . This metaphoric expression alludes to the ancient Greek torch race, in which a lighted torch was passed from one runner to the next. A translation from both Greek and Latin, the English version dates from the late 1800s.
See also: pass, torch

carry the torch

If you carry the torch for something such as a political party or a particular belief, you support it very strongly and try to persuade other people to support it too. Note: The torch referred to in these expressions is a long stick with burning material at one end which provides a light. This kind of torch is sometimes used in processions or parades. This group aims to carry the torch for the millions of people who demonstrated and the thousands who died. I just want to thank all of you for carrying the torch, for being the solid base that makes our party what it is. Note: Other verbs can be used instead of carry. There's nobody left to take up the torch for the group at national level.
See also: carry, torch

carry a torch for someone

If you carry a torch for someone, you are in love with them but they do not love you. Note: The torch referred to in these expressions is a long stick with burning material at one end which provides a light. This kind of torch is sometimes used in processions or parades. What makes a woman so special that a man will carry a torch for her all his life? Note: The verb hold is sometimes used instead of carry. He never saw the woman again. And he went through the rest of his life holding a torch for her.
See also: carry, someone, torch

pass the torch to someone

If you pass the torch to someone, you pass responsibility for something to them. Note: The torch referred to in these expressions is a long stick with burning material at one end which provides a light. This kind of torch is sometimes used in processions or parades. Supposedly, he would pass the torch to LeMond, seven years his junior.
See also: pass, someone, torch

carry a torch for

feel (especially unrequited) love for.
1996 TV Times A dentist carrying a torch for the local ‘strawberry blonde’ wonders if he married the right woman.
See also: carry, torch

hand on (or pass) the torch

pass on a tradition, especially one of learning or enlightenment.
The image here is that of the runners in a relay passing on the torch to each other, as was the custom in the ancient Greek Olympic Games. The tradition of the torch relay is preserved as a prelude to the modern Olympics, with a team of runners carrying the Olympic torch vast distances across various countries until the site of the Games is reached.
See also: hand, on, torch

put to the torch (or put a torch to)

destroy by burning.
See also: put, torch

carry a ˈtorch for somebody

be in love with somebody, especially somebody who does not love you in return: She’s been carrying a torch for him for years.
See also: carry, somebody, torch

put something to the ˈtorch

(literary) set fire to something deliberately: The original castle was put to the torch in the 18th century, although it was rebuilt later.
See also: put, something, torch

pass the torch

To relinquish (responsibilities, for example) to another or others.
See also: pass, torch

carry a torch

To have longstanding feelings of love that are not requited: still carrying the torch for a man she knew in her twenties.
See also: carry, torch

put to the torch

To destroy by fire; burn down.
See also: put, torch

carry a torch

To love someone, often secretly, who doesn't reciprocate the feeling. The torch of the phrase could mean the flame of love or a handheld flame that lights the way to spy on the object of your affection, who is probably with his or her current flame.
See also: carry, torch
References in periodicals archive ?
Explain that torches are a type of product that were designed and produced to turn energy from the battery into light.
A total of eleven different torch styles including the industry's first straight torch and now our new long torches make it easy to choose the torch that makes the most sense for each particular application.
ABIMIGA A T LW Torch's modular attribute has given it a competitive edge over the traditional welding torches in terms of enhanced efficiency, improved ergonomics, and reduced operational costs.
After that, all torches should be returned to the Westborough Public Library, where they will be put on display.
The National Library of Wales will unveil six vintage torches used in previous Games at a reception for the torch next Monday.
Solid fuels were still being used in the 1960s, when torches employed compressed mixtures of nitrates, sulphur, alkaline metal carbonates, resins, and silicon.
These beautifully designed characters double as torches, are available in both Cinderella and Snow White and look superb on any girl's bedside table.
I want to thank you for the tremendous support you provided to the Fighting Marlins through your letters and freedom torches during our recent deployment.
New York City Chief Fire Marshall Louis Garcia (Bureau of Fire Investigation) issued a directive that became effective last June regarding what he described as "the reckless and illegal practice of using propane torches in installing modified roofing material on combustible (wood deck) roofs, and establishing guidelines for the arrest and prosecution of individuals and companies responsible for this reckless behavior.
One of the highlights of the collection are torches from the torch light parades of the 1800s.
It happened this summer when General Motors Corp's Defiance, OH, Central Foundry Div formally accepted for production a cupola melting system that uses six electrically-powered plasma torches as the heat source for a 45-ton-per-hour continuous melting furnace producing gray iron.
NYSE: WOR) company, announced today it is introducing a full line of hand torch products, including hand torches, kits and six interchangeable burners, to be sold at retail stores under the Worthington Pro Grade[TM] brand.
They held their very own torch relay as well as making their own torches to learn about the special event.
When the London Olympic torch arrives at Bamburgh around 6pm for a half-hour stay, another 14 original torches will be display in the village.
The sale is one of many by Olympic torchbearers who have started to cash in on their once-in-a-lifetime privilege by selling their torches on eBay.