torch


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Related to torch: TORCH Test

carry the torch for (someone)

To be in love with someone, especially secretly and/or unrequitedly. I've carried the torch for her since high school, but I've never been able to tell her how I feel. Susan carried the torch for him for years after they broke up.
See also: carry, torch

hand on the torch

To give something to someone else, often one's position and/or responsibilities. Because Gina is retiring, she is handing on the torch to me, and I'll take over her job as supervisor. My grandmother is unable to stand long enough to cook such a large meal, so we're making Thanksgiving dinner this year—she has handed on the torch to us.
See also: hand, on, torch

carry a torch for (one)

To be in love with one, especially secretly and/or unrequitedly. I've carried a torch for her since high school, but I've never been able to tell her how I feel. Susan carried a torch for him for years after they broke up.
See also: carry, torch

carry the torch

To fight for someone or something and encourage or lead others to do the same. While you hate the idea of this big construction project and are ready to carry the torch, you should know that most of the townspeople have been very vocal in their support of it.
See also: carry, torch

pass the torch

To transfer or bestow one's position or responsibilitie to someone else. Because Gina is retiring, she is passing the torch to me as head of the department. My grandmother is unable to stand long enough to cook such a large meal, so she's passing the torch to us to make Thanksgiving dinner this year.
See also: pass, torch

put (something) to the torch

To set fire to something with the intention of destroying it. The soldiers stormed through the village, putting homes to the torch as they went. Many holy scriptures of the religion were put to the torch during the war.
See also: put, torch

carry a torch

To be in love with someone, especially secretly and/or unrequitedly. I've carried a torch for her since high school, but I've never been able to tell her how I feel. Susan carried a torch for him for years after they broke up.
See also: carry, torch

carry a torch (for someone)

 and carry the torch (for someone)
Fig. to be in love with someone who is not in love with you; to brood over a hopeless love affair. John is carrying a torch for Jane. Is John still carrying a torch after all this time?
See also: carry, torch

carry the torch

 
1. Fig. to lead or participate in a (figurative) crusade. The battle was over, but John continued to carry the torch. If Jane hadn't carried the torch, no one would have followed, and the whole thing would have failed.
2. Go to carry a torch (for someone).
See also: carry, torch

carry a torch for

Also, carry the torch for. Continue to feel the pain of unreciprocated love for, as in Jane has been carrying the torch for Bill for at least a year. The torch in this term alludes to the heat of love or passion. [1920s]
See also: carry, torch

pass the torch

Also, hand on the torch. Relinquish responsibilities, a tradition, practice, or knowledge to another. For example, When the company's founder became too ill to continue, he passed the torch to his nephew . This metaphoric expression alludes to the ancient Greek torch race, in which a lighted torch was passed from one runner to the next. A translation from both Greek and Latin, the English version dates from the late 1800s.
See also: pass, torch

carry the torch

If you carry the torch for something such as a political party or a particular belief, you support it very strongly and try to persuade other people to support it too. Note: The torch referred to in these expressions is a long stick with burning material at one end which provides a light. This kind of torch is sometimes used in processions or parades. This group aims to carry the torch for the millions of people who demonstrated and the thousands who died. I just want to thank all of you for carrying the torch, for being the solid base that makes our party what it is. Note: Other verbs can be used instead of carry. There's nobody left to take up the torch for the group at national level.
See also: carry, torch

carry a torch for someone

If you carry a torch for someone, you are in love with them but they do not love you. Note: The torch referred to in these expressions is a long stick with burning material at one end which provides a light. This kind of torch is sometimes used in processions or parades. What makes a woman so special that a man will carry a torch for her all his life? Note: The verb hold is sometimes used instead of carry. He never saw the woman again. And he went through the rest of his life holding a torch for her.
See also: carry, someone, torch

pass the torch to someone

If you pass the torch to someone, you pass responsibility for something to them. Note: The torch referred to in these expressions is a long stick with burning material at one end which provides a light. This kind of torch is sometimes used in processions or parades. Supposedly, he would pass the torch to LeMond, seven years his junior.
See also: pass, someone, torch

carry a torch for

feel (especially unrequited) love for.
1996 TV Times A dentist carrying a torch for the local ‘strawberry blonde’ wonders if he married the right woman.
See also: carry, torch

hand on (or pass) the torch

pass on a tradition, especially one of learning or enlightenment.
The image here is that of the runners in a relay passing on the torch to each other, as was the custom in the ancient Greek Olympic Games. The tradition of the torch relay is preserved as a prelude to the modern Olympics, with a team of runners carrying the Olympic torch vast distances across various countries until the site of the Games is reached.
See also: hand, on, torch

put to the torch (or put a torch to)

destroy by burning.
See also: put, torch

carry a ˈtorch for somebody

be in love with somebody, especially somebody who does not love you in return: She’s been carrying a torch for him for years.
See also: carry, somebody, torch

put something to the ˈtorch

(literary) set fire to something deliberately: The original castle was put to the torch in the 18th century, although it was rebuilt later.
See also: put, something, torch

pass the torch

To relinquish (responsibilities, for example) to another or others.
See also: pass, torch

carry a torch

To have longstanding feelings of love that are not requited: still carrying the torch for a man she knew in her twenties.
See also: carry, torch

put to the torch

To destroy by fire; burn down.
See also: put, torch

carry a torch

To love someone, often secretly, who doesn't reciprocate the feeling. The torch of the phrase could mean the flame of love or a handheld flame that lights the way to spy on the object of your affection, who is probably with his or her current flame.
See also: carry, torch
References in classic literature ?
Here in the cave were none but the dead, and, tossed hither and thither in their last sleep, they looked awful in the glare of the torches.
"You shall be soon satisfied," said the licentiate; "you must know, then, that though just now I said I was a licentiate, I am only a bachelor, and my name is Alonzo Lopez; I am a native of Alcobendas, I come from the city of Baeza with eleven others, priests, the same who fled with the torches, and we are going to the city of Segovia accompanying a dead body which is in that litter, and is that of a gentleman who died in Baeza, where he was interred; and now, as I said, we are taking his bones to their burial-place, which is in Segovia, where he was born."
"Things do not all happen in the same way," answered Don Quixote; "it all came, Sir Bachelor Alonzo Lopez, of your going, as you did, by night, dressed in those surplices, with lighted torches, praying, covered with mourning, so that naturally you looked like something evil and of the other world; and so I could not avoid doing my duty in attacking you, and I should have attacked you even had I known positively that you were the very devils of hell, for such I certainly believed and took you to be."
I could have cried aloud in exultation when my scrutiny disclosed the almost invisible incrustation of particles of carbonized electrons which are thrown off by these Martian torches.
Van Horn centred his electric torch on the black in the rigging, and saw the long parallel scratches on the fingers of the hand that had invaded Jerry's blanket.
I glanced at Raffles, and in the white light of his torch he was doing it all with his ankles, exactly as though he had been riding in a Gymkhana.
And then of a sudden I saw Raffles on my right striking with his torch; a face flew out of the darkness to meet the thick glass bulb with the glowing wire enclosed; it was the face of the boy Olphert, with his enviable moustache, but it vanished with the crash of glass, and the naked wire thickened to the eye like a tuning-fork struck red-hot.
We sailed down to the river, then on through Thames Ditton as far as Esher Station, when we turned sharp to the right, and from the dark stretch by Imber Court came to light in Molesey, and were soon pedalling like gentlemen of leisure through Bushey Park, our lights turned up, the broken torch put out and away.
No fewer than four silver candelabras, holding great waxen torches, served to illuminate this apartment.
Monk took up the torch, and brought it to the foot of the column.
Others struck the archers' in the face with their torches. Others thrust iron hooks into the necks of the cavaliers and dragged them down.
By this time the storm had about reached us; the gusts of wind were flaring the torches and making the shadows swash about, the first heavy drops of rain were falling, the world abroad was black as pitch, the lightning began to wink fitfully.
The soldier with the basket soon got a light, and lighted three or four torches, and took one himself and distributed the others.
I had hold of Joe's hand now, and Joe carried one of the torches. Mr.
By the light of the torches, we saw the black Hulk lying out a little way from the mud of the shore, like a wicked Noah's ark.